Tag Archives: USA

Some US Railroads from Railroad Glory Days

Winter is coming! Prepare the rotaries.When Rotary OM was out on the line. Fireman (and artist) John Coker observes.The whole story: http://RailroadGloryDays.com/Rotary
Denver & Rio Grande Western Rotary OY. More about this at: http://RailroadGloryDays.com/RotaryOY
The return of Colorado & Southern No. 9 (but it lasted only one year): http://RailroadGloryDays.com/CS9

 

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Classic Streamliners, The Southern Belle, Riding the Frisco, UP’s Missouri Pacific Heritage Loco

Classic Streamliners

The Southern Belle, Riding the Frisco, UP’s Missouri Pacific Heritage Loco

The Southern Belle

The Southern Belle

The original Southern Belle was a streamlined passenger train that ran between Kansas City and New Orleans from 1940 until 1969. Thanks to the Kansas City Southern, a new, beautifully-restored Southern Belle streamliner train is now used for business meetings, public affairs and charitable events.

Ridin’ the Frisco

Ride the Frisco Meteor and Texas Special
The St. Louis – San Francisco Railway, also known as the Frisco, operated two beautiful streamliners, the Meteor and the Texas Special

UP’s Missouri Pacific Heritage Locomotive

UP's Missouri Pacific Heritage Locomotive

Before it was merged into the Union Pacific in 1982, the Missouri Pacific was a vast railroad system operating in eleven states. The UP has honored the MP with a beautiful Heritage locomotive.

A CAR SALESMAN’S NIGHTMARE !!!

A CAR SALESMAN’S NIGHTMARE !!!

*She won’t buy a new car until she has worn her old one out and it is
still in new condition. After all it is only 84 years old (the car that is) and, oh yes – the lady…..she’s101!!!).   *

*This lady’s car is a 1930 Packard. What a pleasant and spry lady she
is! Take notice *

*In the video that she lays a shop rag on the running board to step onto
when she gets in and out of the car. Then after she is in the car, she leans all the way down to the running-board to get the rag. She is in great physical and mental shape for her age.

*And the car is not in bad shape either!

*Click on the link below to view this beautiful car and listen to this
wonderful and seemingly *

AGELESS LADY !!!

http://www.youtube.com/embed/qxCpK1W_Gjw?feature=player_embedded

Classic Streamliners – A Festivus Miracle!

Classic Streamliners

A Festivus Miracle!

You might recall a post from about 6 weeks ago that had an image of  SP PA 6006 getting a bath. Click here to refresh your memory.

Since I posted it, I came across 2 more images of this same locomotive that were taken about 4-5 years apart in Ogden, UT. What struck me as an amazing coincidence, maybe even a Festivus miracle, was that the images were taken not only in the same town, but in virtually the exact same location at the SP’s Ogden roundhouse.

The first image shows the 6006 on October 3, 1958. It appears to have a recently replaced lead truck. Note the position of the unit relative to the utility pole in the background.

Southern Pacific PA 6006 at Ogden UT in October, 1958

There’s no date on the second image, but we can narrow down the date to the 1962-1964 range. What’s my basis for this assertion?

The Southern Pacific adopted the lark gray & scarlet locomotive paint scheme in 1959. The paint on the second image isn’t fresh, nor it weather-worn, allowing me to infer the date range.

Based on the position of the utility pole in the background, the 6006 in the second image looks to be about 20 feet from the its location in image one.

Southern Pacific PA 6006 at Ogden UT in the early 1960's

The background scenes are identical save the smokestack has been removed by the time of the second view.

One last thing. There been a fair amount of coverage about Doyle McCormack and the PA that he’s restored to operational condition. Rightfully so.

I just don’t understand why there’s been no coverage about the SP PA that’s the subject of this post. It too is in operational condition in Southern California. Here’s an image of it:

SP_ALCO_PA_2_6006_by_Zephyr303

Classic Streamliners – The Soo Line’s Sleek GM’s Electro-Motive Division F3

Classic Streamliners

The Soo Line’s Sleek General Motors’ Electro-Motive Division F3 Streamlined Diesel Locomotive

The Soo Line's Sleek General Motors’ Electro-Motive Division F3 Streamlined Diesel Locomotive

Builder’s portrait of a Soo Line EMD F3 diesel locomotive. The EMD F3 was a 1,500-hp freight- and passenger-hauling diesel locomotive produced between July 1945 and February 1949 by General Motors’ Electro-Motive Division. Final assembly was at GM-EMD’s La Grange, Illinois plant. A total of 1,111 cab-equipped lead A units and 696 cabless booster B units were built. The F3 was the third model in GM-EMD’s highly successful F-unit series of cab unit diesel locomotives, and it was the second most produced of the series. The F3 essentially differed from the EMD F2 in that it used the “new” D12 generator to produce more power. As built, the only way to distinguish between the F2 and F3 was the nose number panels on the A units, which were small on the F2 and large on the F3. The Soo Line acquired 10 of the A units, numbered 200A, B – 204A, B.

The Soo Line Railroad  is the primary United States railroad subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific Railway (CP), controlled through the Soo Line Corporation, and one of seven U.S. Class I railroads. Although it is named for the Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie Railroad (MStP&SSM), which was commonly known as the Soo Line after the phonetic spelling of Sault, it was formed in 1961 by the consolidation of that company with two other CP subsidiaries, the Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railroad and Wisconsin Central Railroad.

Classic Streamliners – Amtrak Exhibit Train – New York Central System’s GM Aerotrain

Classic Streamliners

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AMTRAK EXHIBIT TRAIN VISITS CHEYENNE, WYOMING

Since 2011, the Amtrak Exhibit Train has travelled the United States to showcase the 40 plus year history of Amtrak, its current railway operations, and its future goals for high-speed passenger travel. On Saturday, May 17th and Sunday, May 18th, that train will visit the historic Cheyenne Depot Museum in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

September-SRR-ADK-0863[1]

The Amtrak Exhibit Train offers a free, self-guided tour of exhibits, artifacts, and Amtrak memorabilia. Pulled by a diesel-electric locomotive, there are three display cars and a gift shop car at the end of the train.

Amtrak-Exhibit-Train-Inside[1]

The visit coincides with the 9th Annual Cheyenne Depot Days. Built by Henry Van Brunt for the Union Pacific in 1886, the depot was donated to the City of Cheyenne and Laramie County in 1993. The Cheyenne Depot Museum, via walk-thru exhibits, provides the history of Cheyenne from the arrival of the transcontinental railroad. This writer visited the museum in 2013 and the detail and lay-out are very impressive.Cheyenne, Wyoming, has been very much an intersection for the railway world of late. On May 8th, the steam train Big Boy 4014 arrived from California to be rebuilt in the local Union Pacific steam shop for future use as an excursion train. Additionally, the upcoming fourth season of AMC’s Hell on Wheels, which dramatizes the building of the first transcontinental railroad, will begin with the historic Cheyenne founded in 1867.

“New York Central System’s GM Aerotrain: The Road to the Future”

A postcard depicting a General Motor’s Aerotrain. From the back of the card: The New York Central System “The Road to the Future.” A General Motors “Aerotrain” is shown on display here at Buffalo, New York in Feb. of 1956. The train failed in regular operation and was in service on the Central less than a year. It was part of a futile effort to upgrade passenger service. Similar units were used briefly on the Pennsylvania and the Union Pacific Railroads. By 1969 the Road to the Future had proved to be the Road to Ruin. The card was distributed in 1970 by Owen Davies, Bookseller.

Classic Streamliners – ‘Route of the Florida Sunbeam’ & The City of Los Angeles

Classic Streamliners

‘Route of the Florida Sunbeam’

Florida Sunbeam

THE FLORIDA SUNBEAM was operated by the New York Central System, the Southern Railway System, and the Seaboard Airline Railroad. On Jan. 1, 1936 the Florida Sunbeam was inaugurated as a winter-only train between Cincinnati and both coasts of Florida with through cars from Great Lakes cities. In 1949 it was replaced with the much faster, streamlined NEW ROYAL PALM on a changed routing. This linen postcard depicts an ALCO DL-109 diesel locomotive pulling the train. It was advertised as being diesel powered between Cincinnati, Ohio and Valdosta, Georgia.

“The City of Los Angeles: Union Pacific’s Top-of-the-Line Streamlined Passenger Train”

City of Los Angeles

Postcard photo of the streamliner City of Los Angeles near Sterling, Illinois and traveling along the Rock River. The train is pulled by a EMC E2 locomotive. The City of Los Angeles was a streamlined passenger train between Chicago, Illinois, and Los Angeles, California via Omaha, Nebraska, and Ogden, Utah. Between Omaha and Los Angeles it ran on the Union Pacific Railroad; east of Omaha it ran on the Chicago and North Western Railway until October 1955 and on the Milwaukee Road thereafter. This train was the top-of-the-line for the Union Pacific, which marketed it as a competitor to the Super Chief, a streamlined passenger train on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, and the Golden State, a streamlined passenger train jointly operated by the Rock Island and Southern Pacific railroads. As with the City of Los Angeles, many of the train’s cars bore the names of locales in and around its namesake city. Circa late 1940s.

http://classicstreamliners.wordpress.com/

Railway Miscellany – Railroads Create the First Time Zones – St. Paul Union Depot, Seven Years After Closing

Railway Miscellany

November 18, 1883: Railroads Create the First Time Zones

tumblr_mwgum66Axb1r2u8sso1_r1_500Photo: Railroads. Men working on locomotive II, ca. 1920-ca. 1950. (Library of Congress)

On this day in 1883, American and Canadian railroads began using four continental time zones. This stemmed from schedulers’ confusion transporting passengers across thousands of local times. Most towns in the United States had their own local times based on “high noon” when the sun reached its highest point in the sky.
The railroad companies created the new time coding system without assistance from the federal government. Most Americans and Canadians embraced the time zones since railroads were the primary link between the two countries. Congress did not officially adopt the time zones until 1918 under the Interstate Commerce Commission.
Check out American Experience’s “Streamliners” timeline of significant events related to the development of American railroads.

St. Paul Union Depot, Seven Years After Closing, 1978

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tumblr_mm2nmvZlof1r5yoejo3_500Photo via Flickr: Electroburger’s Photostream

Passenger rail service officially came to an end in downtown St. Paul on April 30, 1971. The last train, the Burlington Afternoon Zephyr, left the depot that evening, bound for Minneapolis. Amtrak launched its passenger service to the Twin Cities the next day, bypassing downtown St. Paul. These photos, taken seven years after the fact, come from a wonderful collection by Kurt Haubrich.

Classic Streamliners – ‘The Flying Yankee’ & ‘The Cincinnatian’

Classic Streamliners

“The Flying Yankee: An Early Streamlined Articulated Trainset”

flyin_yank

The Flying Yankee was a diesel-powered streamliner built in 1935 for the Maine Central Railroad and the Boston and Maine Railroad by Budd Company and with mechanical and electrical equipment from Electro-Motive Corporation. It was also the name of a passenger train, the third streamliner train in North America after the Union Pacific Railroad’s M-10000 and the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad’s Pioneer Zephyr; the Flying Yankee was, in fact, a virtual clone of the latter, except that it dispensed with the baggage/mail space to seat 142 in three articulated cars.

“The Cincinnatian, The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad’s De Luxe All-Coach Passenger Streamliner”

Ciccinnatian Diesel

The Cincinnatian was a named passenger train operated by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O). The B&O inaugurated service on January 19, 1947, with service between Baltimore, Maryland and Cincinnati, Ohio, essentially a truncated route of the B&O’s National Limited, which operated between Jersey City, New Jersey and St. Louis, Missouri. The Cincinnatian is most famed for its original dedicated equipment, rebuilt in the B&O Mount Clare Shops. The design work was done by Olive Dennis, a pioneering civil engineer employed by the railroad and appointed by Daniel Willard to special position in charge of such work for passenger service. The livery used the blue and gray scheme designed by Otto Kuhler, which Dennis laid on the engine and tender in a pattern of horizontal stripes and angled lines. In 1950, its route was changed to travel between Detroit and Cincinnati; the train kept this route until 1971, when Amtrak assumed passenger rail service.

Cin SteamPostcard photo of the Baltimore and Ohio train The Cincinnatian when it was a streamlined steam locomotive. The locomotive shown is No. 5301, “The President Adams”, a 4-6-2 Pacific style locomotive. This photo was taken in July 1956; just a few months later, the beautiful steam-powered streamlined locomotive would be replaced by a more modern and cost-effective diesel.

http://classicstreamliners.wordpress.com

Railroad Glory Days – Railway Miscellany – Seattle Station

Railroad Glory Days

Railway Miscellany – Seattle Station

TrainTimeKingStreetTrain time at King Street. Seattle’s station is looking much better in the last few years.  (Glen Brewer) http://RailroadGloryDays.com

King Street Station is a train station in Seattle, Washington, United States. Located between South King and South Jackson streets and Second and Fourth Avenues South in the Pioneer Square neighbourhood of Seattle, the station is just south of downtown. Built between 1904 and 1906, it served the Great Northern Railway and Northern Pacific Railway from its grand opening on May 10, 1906, until the creation of Amtrak (the National Railroad Passenger Corporation) on May 1, 1971. The station was designed by the St. Paul, Minnesota architectural firm of Charles A. Reed and Allen H. Stem, who were later associate designers for the New York Central Railroad’s Grand Central Terminal in New York City. King Street Station was Seattle’s primary train terminal until the construction of the adjacent Oregon & Washington Depot, later named Union Station, in 1911. King Street Station was added to the National Register of Historic Places and the Washington Heritage Register in 1973.
Since the early 1990s the station was in various states of repair to undo remodels done during the middle of the Twentieth Century to “modernize” the facility, including the restoration of the elegant main waiting room. King Street Station was purchased by the City of Seattle in 2008 for $10 and, with enough funds finally in place, the restoration was finally completed in 2013.

King Street Station, Seattle

King Street Station, Seattle

This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license. felix_s