Tag Archives: Steam Trains

Mick Doman’s last train ride

Chasewater Railway

Mick Doman’s last train ride

Sunday Staff Photo - 2010The Chasewater Railway Museum Sunday Staff – 2010

(Mick, Godfrey & John)

Dave Doman brought his father’s ashes to Chasewater Railway for one last journey on a steam locomotive.  He travelled on the footplate of the Barclay Loco ‘Coln McAndrew’ driven by Keith Sargeant.

The photos at the end of the video show the train ready to leave Brownhills West, Mick’s return from his trip and passed back to son Dave, and one final visit to the footplate of Hawthorn Leslie engine, ‘Asbestos’.

 

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Some Early Lines, Old Railway Companies, Bedford Railway, Bedford & Cambridge Railway

Some Early Lines

Old Railway Companies

EPSON scanner imageBedford St Johns railway station.

Cambridge – Bletchley line, which was closed on 1/1/68, view SW towards Bletchley (left), the connection to Bedford Midland Road being to the right. This station survived as a terminus until on 14/5/84 a replacement station was opened on the loop to Midland Road station and Bletchley trains then terminated there.
Date 4 June 1962  From geograph.org.uk  Author Ben Brooksbank

Licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license.

Bedford Railway

An 1836 plan for a line between Cambridge and the London & Birmingham Railway via Bedford was dropped, but in 1844 George Stephenson visited Bedford to discuss a branch which, when authorised on 30 June 1845 and opened on 17 November 1846, was a line from Bletchley to Bedford. It was built by the London & Birmingham Railway, and absorbed by the London & North Western Railway on completion as provided for by the authorising Act, though the Company was not dissolved until 21 July 1879. It became the basis for the Bedford & Cambridge Railway.

Bedford & Cambridge Railway

60The fine Midland-type canopy of the Bedford & Cambridge Railway at Potton, Beds. When this picture was taken, in July 1987, restoration was in hand with a view to use as a museum

Incorporated on 6 August 1869 as a 29.5-mile line between the two towns, the route used the track-bed of the Sandy & Potton Railway which the Company bought out. Opinions differ on the date of opening, some citing 1 August 1862, others October of that year. The Company had close ties with the London & North Western Railway, with which Working Agreements were made under an Act of 23 June 1864, and which absorbed it on 5 July 1865. The line closed to passengers on 1 January 1968.

millbrook(harden4.1966)5Disused Stations:Millbrook Station
http://www.disused-stations.org.uk
The attractive blue paviours were also used at a number of stations on the Bedford and Cambridge Railway.

Some Early Lines, Old Railway Companies, Bangor & Caernarfon Railway

Some Early Lines

Old Railway Companies

Bangor & Caernarfon  Railway

59

Incorporated on 20 May 1851 to build between the two towns, the junction with the Chester & Holyhead Railway, which was authorised to work the line, was actually a Menai Bridge. It was an 8.5 single line, with a one-mile branch to Port Dinorwic (Y Felinheli), which opened on 1 March 1852 for goods. The line opened throughout for passengers on 1 July and for goods on 10 August. Agreement to lease the line to the Chester & Holyhead Railway for 999 years was made with effect from 1 July 1852, but the Company was instead transferred by an Act on 10 July 1854; dissolution was delayed until 15 July 1867. The line was doubled in 1872, re-singled in 1966, and closed to goods on 4 August 1969, though there was a respite when Caernarfon became a temporary freight terminal during the rebuilding of the Britannia Bridge in 1970-72.

The old Britannia Bridge on a postcard from the private collection of Jochem Hollestelle

The old Britannia Bridge on a postcard from the private collection of Jochem Hollestelle

Andrew Dixon. Location: Britannia Bridge taken from the Nelson memorial on the Menai Strait, Anglesey

Andrew Dixon.
Location: Britannia Bridge taken from the Nelson memorial on the Menai Strait, Anglesey – 2005

Britannia Bridge is a bridge across the Menai Strait between the island of Anglesey and the mainland of Wales. It was originally designed and built by Robert Stephenson as a tubular bridge of wrought iron rectangular box-section spans for carrying rail traffic. Following a fire in 1970 it was rebuilt as a two-tier steel truss arch bridge, carrying both road and rail traffic.

A view looking west from the island platform at Menai Bridge in August 1964. The goods train is standing at the up Afon Wen line platform which was used by passenger services travelling towards Bangor. To the left can be seen the down Afon Wen line platform. The platform that can be seen to the right served trains travelling towards Holyhead. Photo by Bevan Price

A view looking west from the island platform at Menai Bridge in August 1964. The goods train is standing at the up Afon Wen line platform which was used by passenger services travelling towards Bangor. To the left can be seen the down Afon Wen line platform. The platform that can be seen to the right served trains travelling towards Holyhead.
Photo by Bevan Price

JOHN POWELL COLLECTION www.6g.nwrail.org.uk640 × 452Search by image Caernarfon Station, 10th August 1962. Engine No 42487 arrives with a train for Afonwen.

JOHN POWELL COLLECTION
http://www.6g.nwrail.org.uk640 × 452Search by image
Caernarfon Station, 10th August 1962. Engine No 42487 arrives with a train for Afonwen.

Caernarvon railway station was a station on the former Bangor and Carnarvon Railway between Caernarfon, Gwynedd and Menai Suspension Bridge near Bangor. The station was closed to all traffic in January 1972. The station has since been demolished and the site redeveloped.

 

Some Early Lines, Old Railway Companies, Alloa Railway

Some Early Lines

Old Railway Companies

Alloa Railway

Authorised on 11 August 1879, this 3-mile branch ran from the Caledonian Railway’s South Alloa branch, across the river Forth to Alloa. The Caledonian Railway paid for the line, absorbing the Company with effect from 1 September 1884, the Act (14 July) also authorising extension. The line opened on 1 October 1885 – the North British Railway had running powers.

57A glassy River Forth and a line of bridge stanchions, reflecting, perhaps, on times past. They once carried the Alloa Railway to the industrial town on the north bank.

The Alloa railway was connected to the Stirling and Dunfermline Railway by a connecting line from Longcarse Junction built by the North British Railway in exchange for reciprocal running powers.

British Railways added a second connection from Longcarse Junction to Alloa Marshalling Yard (parallel with the S&D line) in 1957. This made the turntable at Alloa passenger station redundant.

Alloa Swing Bridge
The swing bridge across the Forth was opened on 1 October 1885. It was subsequently closed twice due to storm damage in 1904/5 and 1920/1.

Old Alloa Station - early 1900s www.scot-rail.co.uk

Old Alloa Station – early 1900s
http://www.scot-rail.co.uk

Some Early Lines, Old Railway Companies, Aberdeen Railway

Some Early Lines
Old Railway Companies

Aberdeen Railway

Aberdeen, Gateway to Royal Deeside.  LNER/LMS Vintage Travel posyers

Aberdeen, Gateway to Royal Deeside. LNER/LMS Vintage Travel posters http://www.travelpostersonline.com  Frank H.Mason

The Aberdeen Railway was a railway that ran mainly along the North East coast of Scotland south from Aberdeen to Guthrie on the Arbroath and Forfar Railway. There were branches to Montrose and Brechin.

015329_7130a675The sidings and railway lines Aberdeen railway station
View taken from near the top of College Street car park. The station itself is off to the bottom left of the photo.
Creative Commons Licence [Some Rights Reserved] © Copyright Lizzie and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Incorporated on 31 July 1845 for a line from Guthrie (Arbroath and Forfar Railway) to Aberdeen, with branches to Brechin and Montrose, it was promoted by  Great North of Scotland Railway supporters, who arranged for amalgamation should it be thought appropriate.  However, by the time half the capital was paid up and spent, the Companies had drawn apart.  It was worked by the Scottish Central Railway between 12 May 1851 and31 July 1854, and the Company amalgamated with the Scottish Midland Junction Railway on 29 July 1856 to form the Scottish North Eastern Railway, connecting Perth to Aberdeen. This latter company was absorbed by the Caledonian Railway on 10 August 1866, which in turn became part of the LMS on 1 July 1923.

Openings

1 February 1848 – Guthrie (Arbroath and Forfar Railway) to Montrose
1 November 1849 – Dubton to Portlethen
1 April 1850 – Portlethen to Aberdeen Ferryhill
2 August 1853 – Aberdeen Ferryhill to Aberdeen Guild Street

Aberdeen_Railway_Station_-_geograph.org.uk_-_249839The station currently standing was built as Aberdeen Joint Station between 1913–16, replacing an 1867 structure of the same name, on the same site. The station and the new Denburn Valley Line enabled the main line from the south and the commuter line from Deeside to connect
with the line from the north. The lines from the south had previously terminated at the adjacent Aberdeen Guild Street. Even this had not been Aberdeen’s first railway station, that distinction belonging to a previous terminus a short way south at Ferryhill. After the construction of the Joint Station, Guild Street Station became a goods station. Some of its tracks remain, but the vast majority of the site was cleared in 2005.

This image was taken from the Geograph project collection. See this photograph’s page on the Geograph website for the photographer’s contact details. The copyright on this image is owned by Stanley Howe and is licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license.

USA Railways – From Railroad Glory Days

USA Railways

From Railroad Glory Days

Railroad Glory Days

SmokyIt has been a long time since Denver had a visit from Union Pacific 3985.

Railroad Glory Days

MoffatStation2Denver actually has two remaining railroad stations: the well known Union Station, and the long disused Moffat Station shown here in a photo taken yesterday.

Moffat Station was the Denver terminus of David Halliday Moffat’s Denver, Northwestern and Pacific Railroad. This railroad was a latecomer to Denver — construction begun in 1904. It was projected to be the short route between Denver and Salt Lake City. Although the railroad never achieved Moffat’s (1839 – 1911) goal,ending a Craig, it survived long enough to be absorbed into the Denver & Rio Grande Western in 1947.

The station, designed by Edwin Moorman, is said to be predominantly Georgian Revival architecture and was opened to business in 1906. It has been redeveloped for a new use among overwhelming, larger new buildings that constitute Denver’s burgeoning LoDo neighborhood.

Much more about Denver architecture at http://RailroadGloryDays.com/GhostBldgs

Steam Railways in Preservation in the 1980s-90s From May 14, 1993, Two Bulleid Pacifics, two from Festiniog, and 34046 Braunton

Steam Railways in Preservation in the 1980s-90s From May 14, 1993

Two Bulleid Pacifics, two from Festiniog, and 34046 Braunton

2 Bulleids Mid Hants

100 at Festiniog Gwyn Roberts

100 at Festiniog Gwyn Roberts

Braunton in the rough!

Braunton in the rough!  May 14 1993

 

BR(SR) Rebuilt Bulleid Light Pacific locomotive no 34046 Braunton
is owned and operated by Locomotive 34046 Ltd.
It was restored from scrapyard condition to full working order by
West Somerset Restoration at Williton on the West Somerset Railway,
where the locomotive ran for some years.
It is currently in the process of being equipped and certified
for mainline operation on Network Rail.
http://www.34046braunton.co.uk

Braunton GeographNo.34046 ‘Braunton’ at Woldingham November 2013
BR Rebuilt Light Pacific 4-6-2 seen with ‘The Blue Bell Explorer’ for Sheffield Park and Uckfield. No.44932 LMS Class 5MT 4-6-0 was bringing up the rear, required for the return journey from Uckfield.
© Copyright Peter Trimming and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Steam Railways in Preservation in the 1980s-90s From May 14, 1993, No.47 Moorbarrow

Steam Railways in Preservation in the 1980s-90s

From May 14, 1993

Moonbarrow Loughborough32

The  LWR is situated in a beautiful part of the Lincolnshire countryside between the Wolds and the coast, and is only a short distance from Grimsby, the seaside resort of Cleethorpes and the historic market town of Louth.

The railway operates on a stretch of line that was part of the Great Northern route from Boston to Grimsby.   

After the last section of line was closed by BR in 1980, a preservation society was formed with the aim of restoring it. Heritage steam trains once again run between Ludborough and North Thoresby and work is now in progress to extend the line southwards towards Louth.

What visitors to the railway see today is a result of all the time and effort that a small, but dedicated band of volunteers have put in over many years.

LWRwww.lincolnshirewoldsrailway.co.uk

Some Early Lines, Old Railway Companies, London, Midland & Scottish Railway

Some Early Lines

Old Railway Companies

1393 LMS Coat of ArmsIn Chasewater Railway Museum

London, Midland & Scottish Railway

Formed by the amalgamation, with effect from 1 January 1923, of the Furness Railway, Glasgow & South Western Railway, Highland Railway, London & North Western Railway, Midland Railway and North London Railway. Many smaller companies were absorbed at the same time including several in Ireland, previously owned by the Midland Railway. The Caledonian Railway and the North Staffordshire Railway, because of certain legal requirements not completed by the due date, entered the fold from 1 July 1923. This gave the LMS lines stretching from Thurso to Bournemouth (via the Somerset & Dorset Railway) and from Holyhead to Lowestoft (via the Midland & Great Northern Joint Railway), and access to Southend (LT&SR) and South Wales (via the ex-Neath & Brecon Railway).

Under the Transport Act 1947, along with the other members of the “Big Four” British railway companies (GWR, LNER and SR), the LMS was nationalised on 1 January 1948, becoming part of the state-owned British Railways.

The LMS was the largest of the Big Four railway companies serving routes in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

800px-LMS_shield_on_station_in_leedsLMS shield carved into stonework on station building in Leeds
Date  17 September 2007 (original upload date)

Source:  Transfered from en.wikipedia Transfer was stated to be made by User:oxyman. Author  Original uploader was Redvers at en.wikipedia
(Original text : Redvers)  Licensing:  This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Steam Railways in Preservation in the 1980s-90s, From May 14, 1993. Rebuilt West Country Class 34101 ‘Hartland’

Steam Railways in Preservation in the 1980s-90s, From May 14, 1993.

Rebuilt West Country Class 34101 ‘Hartland’

Following a successful steam test on April 15th (1993) rebuilt West Country Class 34101 ‘Hartland’ is now making excellent progress towards full restoration at the Great Central railway.
The locomotive is presently estimated to be returned back to full working order by mid-summer.
Thanks are being offered to all those who have made this possible, but further donations are still urgently required for the 34101 Restoration Fund at the Great Central Railway. A donations box is also situated at the bufferbeam end of the locomotive.

Hartland at Grosmont34101 “Hartland” at Grosmont Crossing
The 34101 Hartland, West Country Class 4-6-2 built in Brighton in 1950, rebuilt 1960, pulling out of Grosmont station on the NYMR.
© Copyright David P Howard and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Steam Locomotive BR 34101 HARTLAND
SR Classes WC & BB Bullied 4-6-2 Pacific
Rebuilt West Country & Battle of Britain loco
Heritage & Preserved Steam Locomotive Engines
My Archive Steam Photos from the 1960s
Technical detail specifications of locomotive 34101: Boiler pressure of 34101: 250 lbf/sq.in., Weight of 34101: loco 86.0 tons, tender ~42-48 tons, Wheel diameter of 34101: 3′ 1”, 6′ 2″, 3′ 1″, Valve gear of 34101: Walschaerts, Cylinders (diameter x stroke) of 34101: 16⅜” x 24″ (3), Tractive effort of 34101: 27720 lbf., BR Power classification of 34101: Class 7P
Bullied SR 4-6-2 pacific design, (34101 HARTLAND originally built with air smoothed casing, removed in rebuilding), thermic syphons and Boxpox driving wheels.
Steam locomotive 34101 HARTLAND was built in 1950 with air smoothed casing at Brighton Works, but was rebuilt by Jarvis in 1960 at Eastleigh Works. It is currently being rebuilt and hopefully restored to full working order at NYMR’s Grosmont workshops on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway. http://www.docbrown.info