Tag Archives: Midland Royal Saloon

Chasewater Railway Museum 1964 Nov Bits & Pieces 23

From The ‘Mercian’ November 1964, 3.2

Due to the Editor Mr. David Bullock having other heavy commitments he resigned with Mr. M. D. Willis taking over.

The first annual Dinner and Social Evening was announced, to be held at the Eaton Lodge Hotel (demolished about 2006), tickets 12/6d each (62½p) on Monday 30th November 1964.

The Secretary thanked Mr. Bullock for his work over the past few years, wished Mr. Willis well and put out the usual appeal for members to help with the restoration work.

Treasurer’s Report

It is now some considerable time since my last report appeared in these pages and the financial situation has been through many changes.

At the present moment, I am pleased to be able to report that we have the healthiest bank balance there has been to date.  This does not mean, however, that we can afford to relax since much of our money is already committed to paying for such items as the lease for the Chasewater branch, outstanding loans and the E1 0-6-0tank locomotive.  Incidentally, over £200 is still needed to save this engine from the scrapyard.  The deadline is January, so the matter is URGENT.

A few weeks ago we held our AGM at which it was unanimously agreed that the subscription rates be increased from 21/-  (£1.05) to 25/-  (£1.25) for ordinary members and from 5/-  (25p) to 10/-  (50p) for student members.  I would like to state now, that this was done with some reluctance but with every good cause as many members are aware.

F.J.Harvey.  Hon. Treasurer.

General News

We are not responsible

One may have read in the Railway press that the ‘Railway Preservation Society’ is to attempt to purchase a 30 mile stretch of line between Uttoxeter and Buxton.  This is entirely due to a mis-use of the Society’s name.

The Society which appears to be responsible for this irresponsible scheme is the Derbyshire Railway Society, who used our name, and this month, November, has changed it to the ‘National Railway Preservation Society’.  We deplore such use of our Society’s name, or any name which might be remotely confused with ours.

Has this Society yet looked at current branch line prices?  A line of this size would cost at least £100,000.  How could such a line be purchased, and if by some miracle it was, how could any Society afford to maintain it, yet alone run their own trains over it?

Railway enthusiasm in this country does not justify such a hair-raising scheme, as that Society will find out – to their cost!!!

First in a Line?

On June 6th, British Railways held an auction at Stoke-on-Trent.   What was for sale?  The mourning remnants of stations in North Staffs. And South Cheshire, which were closed under Dr. Richard Beeching’s economisation programme.

A rare sight the auction room was!  Scores of platform seats of all types, lined up in two rows to seat their likely buyers.  Station nameboards of all shapes and sizes positioned around the room, intermingled with various types of Railway notices.

The bidding was unexpectedly fierce, two cast iron notices, which the present Hon. Ed. Attempted to purchase for 2/6d  (12½p) almost reached £5, and four well-rotted ‘GENTLEMEN’ notices reached the ludicrous price of 50 shillings  (£2.50).

As always the RPS was in the bidding!  The West Midlands District bought two North Staffordshire Railway Clocks averaging about £9.00 each, and a Midland Railway Lamp Standard, among various other things.  They were joined by Mr. Ken Vincent, Secretary of Dowty RPS and Mr. R. W. F. Smallman, of Yieldingtree Railway Museum Trust fame; their purchases including an NSR platform seat and a GWR short grandfather clock.

British Railways made over £1000 from the so-called ‘rubbish’, the bulk of which would normally provide heat for a cold workman on an icy winter’s day.

Another auction of this type is to be held at Derby on November 7th, and it looks very much as though fantastic prices will be reached yet again.

Recent Additions

The latest relics to arrive at Hednesford are as follows:-

  1. Two private owner wagons of the Cannock & Rugeley Collieries Company.      Bought from the NCB @ £5 each.
  2. A London & North Western Railway Brake/Third, the Guard’s compartment of which has been converted to a fully operational cinema.  It was purchased from the NCB for £10, but needs a lot of attention.
  3. A Midland Railway Crane.  £8.

Midland Railway Royal Saloon

This unique example of Midland Railway Regal coachbuilding has been purchased by the RPS (West Midlands District) from British Railways at a cost of £300.  This was only possible with a loan of £240 from a generous member.

The loan is being paid back at the rate of £10 per month to this fine member, who wished to remain anonymous.  His name was released at the AGM but to save further embarrassment, we will not mention it in these columns, but let it be ‘broadcast’ by word of mouth.Furnishings inside the Midland Royal Saloon

Chasewater Railway Museum 1963 Nov,Dec Bits & Pieces 21

The Mercian Nov – Dec 1963

From the Editorial

WE HAVE A BRANCH LINE AT LAST! And many of you will probably by now know that we have acquired the Chasewater Line from the NCB.  The legal details, lease, etc., are to go through the usual channels to be tied up, and we will keep you informed of progress made.

Every member (and non-members) who travelled on the Great Central Special agreed that it was a very enjoyable day all round, although the train ran at a very heavy loss.  The loss mainly being due to the lack of support by our own members.  We appeal to you all now to donate what you can to help clear this deficit on the Special.The Flying Scotsman uncoupled at Marylebone Station

This trip was organised by Mr. Eric Cowell on 15th June 1963.  The Flying Scotsman hauling the train down the Great Central Line from Sheffield Victoria to Marylebone and back.  Only 27 out of a possible 160 members attended, resulting in a loss of £100.

Open Weekend at Hednesford Depot (June 29th-30th 1963)

In spite of the awful weather the attendance both on Saturday and Sunday exceeded all expectations, approx. 300 people attending for the two days.  People came from as far afield as Halifax, Manchester, Leicester, London and Somerset.  It is sad to report however that there was a noticeable absence of members, just the usual faithfuls plus a few of the not so active.

A great deal of interest was aroused by our modest collection of relics, the Maryport & Carlisle coach was pushed out on the Sunday for photographic purposed, cameras were clicking all over the place.Maryport & Carlisle Coach in 1905 Livery

All in all it was a most successful weekend.  A very special thanks to our lady members Mrs. F. Watson, Miss Mary Watson, Mrs. J. Harvey, Mrs. D. Ives and Mrs. Townsend for manning the buffet car (Great Eastern Brake) and to Mrs. F. Lewis and Mrs. Wormington for providing refreshments.  What would we do without the ladies?  Bless ‘em!

Thanks must also be expressed to the Sutton Coldfield and North Birmingham Model Engineering Society (Affiliated Member) for displaying the lovely Live Steam Models. A big thank you to all members who worked hard and long to make the show the success that it was.

RPS on the air

Mr. C. Ives and Mr. D. Ives were interviewed when BBC’s ‘Down Your Way’ team visited Hednesford on Sunday October 6th.

News in Brief

The ex London, Brighton and South Coast Railway E1 Stroudley loco should soon be stabled in the depot at Hednesford, the NCB has very kindly consented to us having it on free loan for 12 months.

Three new items for Hednesford

We are expecting delivery of the Midland Royal Saloon, L. & Y. Van and Midland Crane all within the next two or three weeks.

The Stroudley E1 is expected about the same time as the above rolling stock.

Through the very kind auspices of Mr. K. Vincent (member) Secretary of the Dowty RPS we are taking delivery of the L & Y van.  Two vans were donated to the Dowty RPS and Ken Vincent has very kindly offered one to us at Hednesford.

Lancs & Yorks Railway Box Van

This goods van was constructed at Newtonheath in 1895, eventually passing from the L & Y to the London, Midland & Scottish Railway at the 1923 grouping.  At an unknown date the vehicle was sold to the Rolling Stock Company, Darlington and, after renovation, sold on to the well-known chocolate manufacturers, Cadbury’s of Bournville and numbered 144 in Cadbury’s wagon fleet.

During 1963, with the arrival of new all-steel box vans at Cadbury’s, the majority of the old internal user vans were withdrawn, with 144 being donated to the Railway Preservation Society and transported to the Hednesford depot before later being transferred to Chasewater.

The van carried the ‘Cadbury’ logo in white at the top of one end, with its stock number at the opposite, lower end.  Overall livery was reddish brown.

Of particular note is the canvas roof flap, a once-common feature enabling goods vans to be loaded from overhead hoists.

Rail traffic at the Bournville factory ceased in 1976.