Tag Archives: Hunslet

Museum News – New Acquisitions

Chasewater Logo 3Museum News

New Acquisitions

An opportunity presented itself  recently to acquire by way of private purchase half a dozen items of local colliery railway interest.  Not since the 1960s and early 1970s, when in that period a good relationship existed between the Railway Preservation Society and local National Coal Board management and which resulted in several donations of interest has the chance to obtain in bulk such star items for the museum collection.

McClean 205103 McClean 0-4-2ST Beyer Peacock 28-1856 Cannock Chase Colliery CoMcClean

First and arguably the finest piece from the Chasewater Railway point of view is the nameplate McClean from the 1856 built Beyer Peacock, the first of five similar locomotives delivered between 1856 and 1872. McClean lasted one hundred years before scrapping and in her later years was considered to be the oldest loco in the country still at work. The name McClean was bestowed in honour of John Robinson McClean who first came on the local scene as engineer in the construction of the South Staffordshire Railway before later, together with Richard Chawner leased land to mine coal forming the Cannock Chase Colliery.

Marquis 2 05008 No.1 Marquis 0-6-0STIC Lilleshall 1867 C & RMarquis
The second of the three locomotive nameplates to arrive is Marquis. The name originates from the first Marquis of Anglesey, a title awarded to the Earl of Uxbridge who fought along side Wellington at the Battle of Waterloo. Carried by the Lilleshall Company built 0-6-0 saddle tank new to the Cannock and Rugeley Collieries as their first loco in 1867, she or is it he lasted until cut up at the NCB Cannock Central Workshops during May 1964.

Beaudesert 205024 No.5 Beaudesert 0-6-0ST Fox Walker 266-1875 C & RBeaudesert
The third nameplate is that of Beaudesert from the little 0-6-0 saddle tank built by Fox Walker, works number 266 of 1875 supplied new to Cannock and Rugeley Collieries as their number 5. Beaudesert was the ancestral home of the Paget family who became Earls of Uxbridge before being given the title and Estate Marquis of Anglesey. Finally cut up in 1964 the other nameplate of the loco survives and is on display in Kidderminster Railway Museum.

2013_0416 RSHTwo locomotive worksplates comprising of a cast iron Robert Stephenson and Hawthorns Ltd, 7292 of 1953 and Hunslet 3789 of 1953 have come as part of the deal.
Both locomotives were of the Austerity type, the RSH coming to Littleton Colliery from its previous owner the War Department, in May 1947, originally WD 71483 she became number 6 at Littleton being cut up there in Oct. 1970.
The Hunslet was delivered to Chasetown numbered 3 and was a replacement for the aged fleet of Victorian locos, she later saw service at Cannock Wood and Granville where she met her end after a life of just 16 years.

2013_0416 Hunslet
Finally a possibly unique cast iron sign headed The Littleton Collieries Ltd. with the wording.

The Littleton Collieries Ltd
Notice No Road
all persons found trespassing
upon or damaging any property
belonging to the above company
will be prosecuted.

Quite where the above sign was fixed is not yet known, but enquiries are being made.
It may be a little while before all of the above items are incorporated into our permanent display but the intention is to make arrangements to put them on view as soon as possible.

Barry Bull
Museum Curator
Chasewater Railway Museum

Notice 2

My thanks to Barry Bull for the information and Bob Anderson for the typing! CWS

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Chasewater Narrow Gauge Railway Video on youtube

The first of two videos of the Chasewater Narrow Gauge Railway is now on youtube.  The second should be on August 31st.

The first one includes clips from before it was open to the public, and the second one from the Fiftieth Anniversary Gala to 2011.

Hunslet 0-6-0ST 3783/1953 – Darfield No.1

Darfield No.1

Built by Hunslet Engine Co., Leeds in 1953, their works number 3783, the loco is a late example of the manufacturers 16 inch inside cylindered, six-coupled saddle tank with the tank not extending over the smokebox.  The design pre-dates the rather better known Austerity type from Hunslet.

Darfield No.1, together with a sister, No.2 was supplied new to Darfield Colliery, Wombwell, South Yorkshire.  The colliery situated half a mile north west of Wombwell Station on the BR (ex LNER) line.

For the period July 1955 to 1959 No.1 was transferred away to Houghton Main Colliery, Little Houghton.  On return to Darfield No.1 worked until sold into preservation in late 1974, initially to a private site in Delph, Lancashire before seeing use on the Yorkshire Dales Railway at Embsay.  A move to the Llangollen Railway followed and No.1 sees occasional use there as well as being hired out to other preserved railways, most recently a return to a former home at Embsay.  Arrival on hire to Chasewater took place 29-7-2011.

Locally there were three similar locos based at Holly Bank Colliery, Essington before transfer to Littleton, with one of the three later moving on to Granville Colliery near Oakengates, Shropshire.

Darfield No.1 weighs 38 tons in working order.In the engine shed at Chasewater Railway

Nechells No.4 on video

Nechells No.4 on video around Chasewater Heaths on July 30th. There are also some stills of the loco as well as a couple of stills of Darfield No.1 in the engine shed at Brownhills West.

July 30th & 31st – Plus Darfield in – one out

RSH 0-6-0t No.7684 “Nechells No.4”

This weekend 30/31st July will see RSH 0-6-0t Nechells No.4 in steam on our service trains
One in/ One out
Darfield at Bolton Abbey on the Embsay Railway
  © Copyright Dr Neil Clifton and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.
We are pleased to announce a new arrival at Chasewater Railway which will see Hunslet 0-6-0st No.3783 of 1953 “Darfield No.1” coming for an extended stay on loan by kind agreement of it’s owner and will be delivered by road from it’s regular base at the Llangollen Railway very shortly. This locomotive is now planned to be included in the upcoming September Gala line up and will then see regular service alongside the home fleet. Unfortunately though it is goodbye to long term resident Andrew Barclay 0-4-0st Wks.No.1964 which has been sold by it’s owner. The big Barclay under the care of it’s new owner will be moving to a new home when it’s annual boiler exam has been undertaken at Chasewater.
The ‘big’ Barclay – 1964/1929, also known at Chasewater as ‘701’ – goodbye and thank you!

Wot – a weekend and no Bank Holiday?!

Wot – a weekend and no Bank Holiday?!

 After the last couple of weekends it’s nice to get back to something approaching normality.Heading into Wirksworth from Duffield

Last weekend, in the company of the oakparkrunner, I made my first visit to the Ecclesbourne Valley Railway.  There’s more about this on www.oakparkrunner.wordpress.com

We had to have a ride on the Narrow Gauge – Lister diesel in charge.

From my point of view, it was a really good day out, meeting new and very friendly people.  Neither of us were particularly interested in the Royal Wedding so this was a first class alternative!Not forgetting a run ‘up the bonk’

Steam at Duffield a little earlier!

Ex Midland Railway 0-4-4 tank arrives No. 58077 arrives at Duffield with a special train for the Wirksworth Branch, summer 1953.  P.B.Whitehouse.

The Midland Compound No.1000 in steam at Wirksworth specially for filming the B.B.C. ‘Railway Roundabout’ programme, June 1960.  P.B.Whitehouse.

‘Jennie’ nearly ready to go

The following day, Saturday, 30th April another first for me.  I have been to Amerton Farm on many occasions but had never had a ride on the railway.  This time I was in luck – I guessed they would be running and hoped it would be steam – they were and it was!  Hunslet ‘Jennie’ in charge.  I thoroughly enjoyed the 1 mile trip, and, again, the friendly people.It’s a really nice set-up at Amerton.

Sunday and Monday, back to Chasewater and the truncated line – still no causeway.  Happily trains were running frequently to the causeway and back and there were plenty of visitors about who seemed to enjoy themselves.  There were one or two who tried to catch trains at Chasewater Heaths but sadly they can’t get there until the work on the causeway has been completed – it is completely out of the railway’s control – watch the official website for news. Click the link in the blogroll.This Sunday, May 8th, Dave Pearce and his friends will be visiting Chasewater again with the ‘Chasewater and Chuff Road Run’ the fifth year running– see the front page for details.

Chasewater Railway Spring Gala

The North British diesel loco preparing to shunt the coal train in the morning sun.

The weekend of March 19th & 20th saw the long-awaited Spring Gala of Chasewater Railway.  Lots of people in the Saturday morning sunshine got the Gala off to a good start.The Narrow Gauge was kept busy on both days – proving very popular.

I didn’t get the chance to leave Brownhills West this year but from what I was able to see, there was plenty going on all day, both days.

Barclay Colin McAndrew heading passed Baguley Bass No.5 into the bay platform.

With the back gate open and the Narrow Gauge running, our visitors got round to the Heritage Centre and Museum without crossing the track and in large numbers.
The Hunslet No.6678 on the front of the coal train.
The Museum has a great day in the Saturday sunshine, breaking the attendance record.  Sunday morning started more slowly, not to mention colder with more cloud, but as the day went on more and more visitors found their way over and we broke the attendance reacord again!!  Por old Mick had to change clicking action fron his thumb to his finger!!  Good to have him back.The Baguley Loco, Bass No.5 ready for action – with what’shisname looking out!
The Hunslet with the 08 in the background
Asbestos coming into Brownhills West.
A busy scene in Brownhills West station – the passenger train has just been brought in by Asbestos and the coal train is moving out past the Hunslet, pulled by the 08.
Bagnall Loco Linda running round between the Hunslet and the Baguley.
Barclay 1964 bringing a passenger train into Brownhills West.
Popular ride!
Like a caged lion!!  He’s the only one who can get in and out comfortably!
Gets everywhere!  Like a rash!!

Another Hunslet Loco pays Chasewater Railway a Visit.

The latest Hunslet locomotive to visit Chasewater Railway arrived this afternoon for final checks. It is fitted with a Cummins 410 HP engine.Two Hunslets together outside the Heritage Centre – the red one brand new and the blue one completely refurbished and looks every bit brand new.The red one is leaving tomorrow, 30th July, and the blue one will stay till sometime next week.

The not-so-new being passed by the as-good-as-new!

Still looking smart Brian, but you’ll have to get your paint brush out!!

Hunslet Engine Co. Ltd., Leeds

The Hunslet Engine Company

The Hunslet Engine Company is aBritish locomotive – building company founded in 1864 at Jack Lane, Hunslet, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England by John Towlerton Leather, a civil engineering contractor, who appointed James Campbell (son of Alexander Campbell, a Leeds engineer) as his Works Manager.

In 1871, James Campbell bought the company for £25,000 (payable in five instalments over two years) and the firm remained in the Campbell family ownership for many years. Between 1865 and 1870, production had averaged less than ten engines per year, but in 1871 this had risen to seventeen and was set to rise over the next thirty years to a modest maximum of thirty-four.

The first engine built in 1865 was Linden a standard gauge 0-6-0 delivered to Brassey & Ballard, a railway civil engineering contractor as were several of the firm’s early customers. Other customers included collieries. This basic standard gauge shunting and short haul ‘industrial’ engine was to be the main-stay of Hunslet production for many years. From the start, Hunslet regularly sent fitters to carry out repairs to its engines on customers’ premises and this is a service that the Hunslet Engine Company were still offering in 2006, over 140 years after their establishment.05081 No.8 0-6-0ST Hunslett 3807-1953  27-3-1954

No.8 0-6-0ST Hunslet 3807/1953

Post World War I

After the war, trading conditions were very difficult but Hunslet were once more able to attract overseas orders and they also received a series of repeat orders from the London, Midland & Scottish Railway for a total of 90LMS Fowler Class 3F  ‘Jinty’ 0-6-0T shunting engines. It was during the 1930s that Hunslet built their largest locomotives. These two 0-8-0 tank engines, built for a special train ferry loading job in China (which they fulfilled for many years) were at that date the largest and most powerful tank engines ever built. A year or so later the same design formed the basis for an 0-8-0 tender engine for India. Many other ‘large-engine’ orders were received in these inter-war years.

Acquisitions

Other independent British manufacturers failed to survive the depression and Hunslet with considerable foresight acquired the patterns, rights and designs of other builders notably Kerr Stewart and the Avonside Engine Co.

Current Operations

The Hunslet Engine Company, is now part of the LH Group of Companies. It now owns the right to use the following British locomotive names, as well as being able to service and repair them, and supply replacement parts:

  • Andrew Barclay
  • Avonside Engine Co.
  • North British Engine Co.
  • Greenwood & Batley
  • Hudswell Clarke
  • John Fowler & Co.
  • Kerr Stewart
  • Kitson & Co.
  • Manning Wardle

Wimblebury

Wimblebury

2009_06200016

A Hunslet 0-6-0ST Austerity class, 3839/1956

Built by Hunslet of Leeds, Wimblebury was delivered new to the National Coal Board at Cannock Wood Colliery near Hednesford in Staffordshire, and worked there until withdrawn in the early 1970s.  Originally earmarked for spares for another engine, Wimblebury was purchased privately for preservation and moved to the Foxfield Railway in Staffordshire on 26th September 1973.

This is the second visit to Chasewater by this popular engine in recent years.