Tag Archives: Great Northern Railway of Ireland

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era – 1932 – 4-4-0 Compounds Great Northern Railway of Ireland

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era

1932 – 4-4-0 Compounds

Great Northern Railway of Ireland

No.86 'Peregine' in 1937 after receiving the then new blue livery

No.86 ‘Peregine’ in 1937 after receiving the then new blue livery

For working the fast expresses over the GNR main line between Dublin and Belfast, the timings of which it was desired to accelerate, G.T.Glover built five 3-cylinder compound 4-4-0s in 1932. This was made possible by reconstructing the Boyne viaduct so as to permit a heavier axle loading which in the new engines amounted to 22 tons. They were built with round-topped boilers with the unusually high working pressure of 250 lb. per square inch, but these were latterly replaced with Belpaire type boilers with reduced pressure. In some ways they followed the design of the well-known Midland compounds. It was the last new compound design to appear in the British Isles. For many years these engines formed the mainstay in working the somewhat difficult schedules of the tightly timed expresses, but were superseded in 1948 by five new somewhat similar engines employing simple propulsion instead of compound, and more recently, by diesel railcars.
They were numbered 83-7, and were named ‘Eagle’, ‘Falcon’, ‘Merlin’, ‘Peregrine’ and ‘Kestrel’, and like so many engines for this railway, came from the works of Beyer Peacock & Co.

Driving wheels – 6’ 7” , Cylinders – 1 HP inside: 17¼”x 26”, 2 HP outside: 19”x 26”, Pressure – 250 lb., (later reduced to 215 lb.), – Tractive effort – 23760 lb., (later reduced to 20435 lb., Classification – W

Steam Locomotives of a More Leisurely Era 1913 – Glover 4-4-2T & 4-4-0 – Great Northern Railway of Ireland

Steam Locomotives of a More Leisurely Era

1913 – Glover 4-4-2T & 4-4-0

Great Northern Railway of Ireland

No.199 as running in 1953No.199 as running in 1953 after receiving the name ‘Lough Derg’ and the blue livery.

G.T.Glover’s first design for the GNR was a series of 4-4-2Ts for suburban work.  Five engines, No. 185-9, came out in 1913.  A 4-4-0 tender version for cross country work, with identical dimensions, Nos. 196-200, followed in 1915.  Ten more of the 4-4-2Ts with increased boiler pressure were built in 1921, Nos. 1-5, a further ten in 1924, Nos. 21, 30, 115, 116, 139, 142-4, 147, and 148 (the last two later became 67 and 69) whilst in 1929 came Nos. 62-6.

The 4-4-0 version was revived in 1947 by the building of an additional five engines, Nos. 201-5.  The design was unchanged except for increase of boiler pressure and a modified tender, and the construction at so late a date of inside-cylindered 4-4-0s of such a neat appearance more in keeping with the earlier years of the century was somewhat remarkable.  The new engines were named after Irish counties and painted in express passenger blue with scarlet frames, which treatment was also accorded to the original 4-4-0s, which had hitherto been plain black.  At the same time these were also given names, after Irish ‘Loughs’.  All of them, both 4-4-0 and 4-4-2T varieties, were still in service in 1959.

4-4-2T (1913) – Driving wheels – 5’ 9”,  Cylinders – 18”x 24”,  Pressure – 175 lb.,  Tractive effort – 16763 lb.,  Weight – 65 tons 4 cwt.,  Classification – T1

4-4-2T (1924) – Driving wheels – 5’ 9”,  Cylinders – 18”x 24”,  Pressure – 200 lb.,  Tractive effort – 19158 lb.,  Weight – 65 tons 15 cwt.,  Classification – T2

4-4-0 (1915) – Driving wheels – 5’ 9”,  Cylinders – 18”x 24”,  Pressure – 175 lb.,  Tractive effort – 16763 lb.,  Weight – 44 tons 6 cwt.,  Classification – U

4-4-0 (1947) – Driving wheels – 5’ 9”,  Cylinders – 18”x 24”,  Pressure – 200 lb.,  Tractive effort – 19158 lb.,  Weight – 46 tons,  Classification – U

Omagh_Station_-_geograph.org.uk_-_332912Omagh railway station, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. GNR Class U 4-4-0 locomotive 204 Antrim departs with a passenger train as a GNR diesel railcar stands at the station.  Date 7 June 1957 7 June 1957 

  The copyright on this image is owned by Wilson Adams and is licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license.