Tag Archives: Chasewater Railway Museum

Chasewater Railway Museum – Recent Addition – Railway Heritage Designated Signal Box Sign

 

Chasewater Railway Museum 

recent Addition, Dec 2015

Railway Heritage Designated Signal Box Sign

The Railway Heritage Committee has the function of designating records and artefacts (or classes of record and artefact) which are historically significant and should be permanently preserved.

Stafford 150 Yards

This enamelled sign came from Stafford No.5 signal box, and was given to the Museum by Network Rail – our thanks to the Company.

stafford5 tillyweb.bizPhoto:  tillyweb.biz

The sign can be seen set into the signal box.  On one end is a white patch with a red arrow, and on the other, a clear white patch to balance up the sign.

It may be of interest to Chasewater Railway members that the Station Hotel, Stafford, where the inaugural meeting of the Railway Preservation Society, fore-runner of Chasewater Railway, was held in 1959, was approximately 150 yards from the signal box!

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Mick Doman’s last train ride

Chasewater Railway

Mick Doman’s last train ride

Sunday Staff Photo - 2010The Chasewater Railway Museum Sunday Staff – 2010

(Mick, Godfrey & John)

Dave Doman brought his father’s ashes to Chasewater Railway for one last journey on a steam locomotive.  He travelled on the footplate of the Barclay Loco ‘Coln McAndrew’ driven by Keith Sargeant.

The photos at the end of the video show the train ready to leave Brownhills West, Mick’s return from his trip and passed back to son Dave, and one final visit to the footplate of Hawthorn Leslie engine, ‘Asbestos’.

 

Mick Doman – RIP

Mick Doman – RIP

Mick in Signal Box - Sept 2014In the Madeley Signal Box, September 2014

A great bloke – a great friend

 

 

The Latest Museum Arrivals – Including a Local Colliery Wagon Plate

The Latest Museum Arrivals – Including a Local Colliery Wagon Plate

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This Cannock & Rugeley Colliery wagion plate is not the most common item ever seen in the museum – in fact, no-one we have asked has ever seen one!  This obviously makes it a bit special.  Unfortunately, it has a crack (repaired) through the right-hand bolt hole – I wonder how that happened?!

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This next item, a book for the library, has come along at a good time – as we have recently seen the return of the horse-drawn parcels van.

It should be pointed out that the horses in this book used to pull carts, vans, etc. unlike the Chasewater Railway Museum version, which seems to prefer to ride in them!

DSCF9294

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The final item was a raffle prize at the recent Gerald Reece talk about Brownhills, and shows Brownhills High Street in the early 1900s, won by one of the museum staff.  If you’ve seen the photo on Brownhills Bob’s site, the bald headed bloke on the back row, right-hand side!

http://brownhillsbob.com/2014/11/30/happy-talk/

 

Some Early Lines, Old Railway Companies, London, Midland & Scottish Railway

Some Early Lines

Old Railway Companies

1393 LMS Coat of ArmsIn Chasewater Railway Museum

London, Midland & Scottish Railway

Formed by the amalgamation, with effect from 1 January 1923, of the Furness Railway, Glasgow & South Western Railway, Highland Railway, London & North Western Railway, Midland Railway and North London Railway. Many smaller companies were absorbed at the same time including several in Ireland, previously owned by the Midland Railway. The Caledonian Railway and the North Staffordshire Railway, because of certain legal requirements not completed by the due date, entered the fold from 1 July 1923. This gave the LMS lines stretching from Thurso to Bournemouth (via the Somerset & Dorset Railway) and from Holyhead to Lowestoft (via the Midland & Great Northern Joint Railway), and access to Southend (LT&SR) and South Wales (via the ex-Neath & Brecon Railway).

Under the Transport Act 1947, along with the other members of the “Big Four” British railway companies (GWR, LNER and SR), the LMS was nationalised on 1 January 1948, becoming part of the state-owned British Railways.

The LMS was the largest of the Big Four railway companies serving routes in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

800px-LMS_shield_on_station_in_leedsLMS shield carved into stonework on station building in Leeds
Date  17 September 2007 (original upload date)

Source:  Transfered from en.wikipedia Transfer was stated to be made by User:oxyman. Author  Original uploader was Redvers at en.wikipedia
(Original text : Redvers)  Licensing:  This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Forthcoming Attractions – Autumn Road Run

Forthcoming Attractions

Autumn Road Run

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277 – Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces From Chasewater News – Autumn 2004 Part 4 – Behind the Scenes, MR Crane, Narrow Gauge

277 – Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces
From Chasewater News – Autumn 2004
Part 4 – Behind the Scenes, MR Crane, Narrow Gauge

Behind the scenes DMBMR CraneNG 1NG 2

276 – Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces From Chasewater News – Autumn 2004 Part 3 – Beattie Well Tank & Bodmin & Wadebridge Railway

276 – Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces
From Chasewater News – Autumn 2004
Part 3 – Beattie Well Tank & Bodmin & Wadebridge Railway

Pic Beattie Well Tank 1Beattie WT 1Beattie WT 2welltankBodmin & Wadebridge 1Bodmin & Wadebridge 2EPSON scanner imageBodmin North Station
View NW: buffer-stops right, Wadebridge left; ex-LSW terminus of branch from Wadebridge, closed completely 30/1/67. Local train for Wadebridge and Padstow in platform, headed by an LMS-type Ivatt Class 2 2-6-2T.
Date 20 April 1964
Source From geograph.org.uk  Author Ben Brooksbank   Permission  Creative Commons Attribution Share-alike license 2.0

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era 1945 – Bulleid ‘West Country’ Pacifics – Southern Railway

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era
1945 – Bulleid ‘West Country’ Pacifics
Southern Railway

No.21C105, later Barnstaple, when new in 1945

No.21C105, later Barnstaple, when new in 1945

A slightly smaller edition of the ‘Merchant Navy’ class, embodying all the same features. 110 of these came out between 1945 and 1949, Nos.21C101-70, and 34071-34110 and 34091-34108 bore names associated with the West Country; most of the others had war-time commemorative names, chiefly air squadrons which took part in the Battle of Britain, which title is sometimes applies as a class name to these particular locomotives. Rebuilding of this class on the same lines as the ‘Merchant Navy’ commenced in 1957 and by 1959 thirty of them had been so treated.
Driving wheels – 6’ 2”, Cylinders (3) 16⅜”x 24”, Pressure – 250 lb., Tractive effort – 27715 lb., Weight 86 tons (as built), 90 tons (as rebuilt), BR classification – 7P5F.

No.34101 Hartland as rebuilt in 1960

Some Early Lines – Old Railway Companies – Furness Railway and Furness & Midland Joint Railway

Some Early Lines

Old Railway Companies

Furness Railway and Furness & Midland Joint Railway

RavenglassThe Furness Railway had a more attractive furniture motif than many lines. Its squirrel lives on in this seat from Millom, now at the Ravenglass terminus of the Ravenglass & Eskdale Railway. (P.van Zeller)

Furness Railway

Seen as a link between Barrow and mines at Lindal, the company was incorporated on 23 May 1844. There was also a 3ft 2¼in gauge line to a slate quarry at Kirkby. Despite poetic fury from Wordsworth, the line progressed well, to be in use by 3 June 1846 and officially opened on 12 August. An extension from Kirkby to Broughton was opened in late February 1848. The discovery of enormous deposits of haematite at Park, north of Barrow, in 1850 made the company one of the most prosperous of its time. A national slump after 1870 prompted thoughts of sale to the Midland Railway in 1875, but a change of emphasis from goods to tourists kept the company successful until the outbreak of the First World War. Absorption of smaller companies extended its system, until by 1918 it owned 428¾ track miles, including sidings. The company remained independent until the Grouping.

Borwick Furness & Mid JtBorwick, on the Furness & Midland Joint Railway. The station (right distance) was built before the railway: when the line arrives, it passed 50 yards to the south-east, and a second station (foreground) had to be built. (Andrew C.Ingram)

Furness & Midland Joint Railway

A link between Wennington (Midland Railway) and Carnforth (Furness Railway) was suggested by the Midland Railway which wanted a share in the rich iron ore traffic from Furness, and offered boat-train traffic to Barrow in exchange. The London & North Western Railway, which had hitherto controlled the FR at both ends, opposed, but a company was incorporated on 22 June 1863, running powers over the FR making life easier for the LNWR. The 9¾ mile line, financed jointly by the two companies and managed by a Joint Committee, opened for goods on 10 April 1867, and to passengers on 6 June. It crossed the LNWR north of Carnforth to a station on the west, a curve leading into the northern side of the LNWR station. The company remained independent until the Grouping.

Furness railway No.20

Furness Railway No.20

The Furness Railway Trust

The Furness Railway Trust – with assets like 1863-built Furness Railway Number 20 and the ex Furness and North London Railway coach – is also working to keep the memory of the Furness Railway alive.

The FRT owns Britain’s oldest working standard gauge steam locomotive, Furness Railway Number 20, GWR duo 0-6-2T 5643 and 4979 “Wootton Hall”, Austerity “Cumbria” and our vintage train.
We are based in the North West of England but our locomotives and carriages are found at heritage railway sites nationwide.
Our fund-raising and your support keeps us going. Why not Gift Aid a donation?!

http://www.furnessrailwaytrust.org.uk/

1663 FR Axle boxFurness Railway Axle Box – in the Chasewater Railway Museum Collection

05069 FR,M&CR,GER, Paddy Train at Pool Pits Junction 24-2-1951Carriages from the Great Eastern Railway, the Maryport & Carlisle Railway and Furness Railway making up the Cannock & Rugeley Colliery ‘Paddy’ train, taken at Pool Pits Junction, Hednesford 24-2-1951