Tag Archives: BR

Steam Locomotives of a More Leisurely Era 1907 – Robinson 0-8-4T Great Central Railway

Steam Locomotives of a More Leisurely Era

1907 – Robinson 0-8-4T

Great Central Railway

One of the two new booster-fitted engines as running 1n 1934One of the two new booster-fitted engines as running in 1934.

Four heavy 3-cylinder 0-8-4Ts constructed by Robinson in 1907 for shunting in the Wath marshalling yard.  Numbered 1170-3, they became LNER 6170-3 at the grouping.  In 1937, No. 6171 was rebuilt with a superheater and provided with a booster driving the near bogie, in which form it became the most powerful tank engine in the country.  Gresley built two additional locomotives similar to 6171 in 1932, numbered 2798 and 2799.  In 1946 the six engines became Nos. 9900-5, and passed into BR hands as 69900-5.  The boosters were removed in 1943 and with the advent of diesels which took over the engines’ duties they became redundant and were broken up between 1954 and 1957.69902

Without booster – Driving wheels – 4’ 8”,  Bogie wheels – 3’ 7”,  Cylinders (3) – 18”x 26”,  Pressure – 180 lb. (originally 200lb),  Tractive effort – 34523 lb.,  Weight – 99 tons 6 cwt.,  GCR classification – 8H,  LNER classification – S1,  BR classification – 7F

With booster – Driving wheels – 4’ 8”,  Bogie wheels – 3’ 2”,  Cylinders (3) – 18”x 26” (plus 2 booster cylinders),  Pressure – 180 lb.,  Tractive effort – 46896 lb.,  Weight – 104 tons 5 cwt.,  GCR classification –,  LNER classification – S1/2,  BR classification –

69904

130 – Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces Alfred Paget nearly got to Bescot – August 1990 – (Or the Not-so-Flying Scotsman) – P. Aldridge

130Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces

Alfred Paget nearly got to Bescot – August 1990

(Or the Not-so-Flying Scotsman) – P. Aldridge

BR’s ‘Bescot Open Day’ took place on Sunday, 6th May.  BR had requested that they borrow our venerable Neilson ‘Alfred Paget’ for the event.  We replied ‘yes’ but only if they cosmetically restored the engine, insured it and provided the transport.

Photo: P.Aldridge

Ian Edwards then spent many hours repainting the loco and even applied ‘No.11’ to the tank sides and buffer beams, so that the old engine looked very fine.  Arrangements were made to move the loco on Good Friday – but were then cancelled (pity no-one thought to tell me!) and re-scheduled for 3rd May.  Various Society members told the BR representative that a lifting frame would be needed and that trying to lift the loco with slings under the frames would not be permitted for fear of damaging our loco.

‘Don’t worry’ they said ‘we are professionals.’

The day arrived, and the said ‘professionals’ brought a low loader and a crane, but no lifting frame! Predictably they were unable to lift the loco, and, after six hours of struggling, gave up!

Thanks are due to Ian Edwards for restoring the loco, even though it did not get to Bescot.  Thanks are also due to Messrs. Emery, Newbold and Organ, plus a hologram of myself (I wasn’t there as I was off work sick) for organising the shunting and supervising the ‘lift’ – or lack of it!

Photo: P.Aldridge

Further thanks are also due to BR who provided the low loader and the crane.  Perhaps next time the ‘professionals’ will listen to us ‘AMATEURS’ who do, after all , have some idea what we are talking about!

Despite this disappointment it wasn’t a total waste of time, for even though our Neilson did not get to the Open Day, our sales stand did, and Mr. Bull added £200 to our coffers in a very successful day’s sales.