Steam Locomotives of a More Leisurely Era 1893 0-8-0 London & North Western Railway

Steam Locomotives of a More Leisurely Era

 1893 0-8-0 London & North Western Railway

 Ex-LNWR ‘Super D’ 0-8-0 No 8929 runs into the goods yard with a goods train. C1930s – warwickshirerailways.com

The history of the 0-8-0 on the LNWR is a very complicated one, and can only be described very briefly here.  Having built large numbers of 3-cylinder compound passenger engines by 1892, Webb turned his attention to producing a similar freight engine, and No.50 appeared as an 0-8-0 engine in September 1893.  Unlike his passenger engines, all the wheels were coupled.  Between 1893 and 1900 a further 110 were turned out, and in 1901 the design was modified to a 4-cylinder compound engine, and 170 of these appeared during the next four years.  When Whale took charge in 1903 he did not start wholesale scrapping as in the case of the passenger engines, but instead began gradually to convert them to 2-cylinder simple engines.  It is here that the complications began to arise, as the rebuilding took several forms: some engines retained the small boilers, and others were provided with larger ones, whilst a number of the 4-cylinder variety were rebuilt as 2-8-0s, still remaining as compounds for the time being, and again some with large and some with small boilers.  Eventually nearly the whole class were converted to simples, but a few remained compounds to the end, some lasting until 1928 in this form.LNWR 0-8-0 No 2562 is seen at the head of a long up mixed goods train travelling on the fast line near Atherstone. C1919-22 – warwickshirerailways.com

In 1910 further new engines to the rebuilt design began to appear from Crewe, and many more followed at intervals until 1918, those built from 1912 onwards having superheaters.  The final development of the design was a batch of sixty engines built between 1921 and 1922.  In all 572 engines had been constructed, and all but one lasted to be absorbed into LMS stock in 1923.  The missing one was an unconverted 4-cylinder compound, whose boiler exploded at Buxton in 1922.

No.8951 rebuilt as a 2-cylinder simple with Belpaire firebox as running in 1948.

The LMS numbers allocated to the class after 1923 were 8900-9454 for the 0-8-0s, and 9600-15 for the 4-cylinder compounds which had been rebuilt as 2-8-0s.  The survivors of the latter, which had meanwhile been converted to 0-8-0 simples, were later altered to 8892-9.  Shortly after the grouping some of them began to appear with Belpaire fireboxes, and by about 1950 all the survivors had been so treated.  502 engines came into BR stock in 1948, and most of these lasted to have 40000 added to their numbers.  About 160 were still at work at the close of 1959.

“A” class 0-8-0 No. 2528 sometime before 1903 – eastsidepilot.wordpress.com

 3-cylinder compound  Driving wheels – 4’ 5½”,  Cylinders (2) 15”x 24” (1) 30”x 24”,  Pressure – 175 lb.,  Weight – 49 tons 5 cwt.,  LNWR Classification – A

4-cylinder compound  Driving wheels – 4’ 5½”,  Cylinders (2) 15”x 24” (1) 20½”x 24”,  Pressure – 200 lb.,  Weight – 53 tons 10 cwt.,  LNWR Classification – B

1912 design  Driving wheels – 4’ 5½”,  Cylinders – 20½”x 24”,  Pressure – 160 lb.,  Weight – 60 tons 5 cwt.,  LNWR Classification – G1,  LMS & BR Classification – 6F

Final 1921 design  Driving wheels – 4’ 5½”,  Cylinders – 20½”x 24”,  Pressure – 175 lb.,  Weight – 60 tons 5 cwt.,  LNWR Classification – G2A,  LMS & BR Classification – 7F

No.8937 running as a 4-cylinder compound in 1927

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