Steam Locos of a Leisurely Era 1890 – Later Adams 4-4-0 London and South Western Railway

Steam Locos of a Leisurely Era

1890 – Later Adams 4-4-0London and South Western Railway

No.684, one of the 7’ 1” engines, still carrying its original chimney in 1926.

These engines constituted William Adams’ final design of express locomotives for the LSWR.  In all, sixty of them appeared between 1890 and 1896, which although of the same general pattern were divided into four classes.  These may be divided into two groups, the chief difference being in the size of the driving wheels, half the engines having 7’ 1” wheels and the remainder 6’ 7”.  This followed an older tradition on the LSWR, under which it had been customary to build engines with somewhat smaller diameter driving wheels for the hilly route between Salisbury and Exeter than those used on the more easily graded lines east of Salisbury.

The 7’ 1” engines were Class X2, Nos. 577-96, built between 1890 and 1892, and Class T6, Nos. 677-86, built in 1895 and 1896

The 6’ 7” series were Class T3, Nos.557-76, built in 1892-3, and Class X6, Nos.657-66, in 1895-6.

It will be noted that the final engines, of Classes T6 and X6, appeared after Adams’ enforced resignation through ill-health in 1895.  At the time of their appearance the X2 engines were considered to be the most powerful express type then running.

The class performed much good service on main line work; although Drummond’s express engines which followed them displaced them to some extent from top link work it was a good many years before they did so entirely.  All of them lasted well into Southern days, and it was not until 1931 that they began to be taken out of service.  The last, No.563, remained in traffic until 1945.  Fortunately it was not broken up, and after lying derelict at Eastleigh for three years it was restored to its original condition and is now preserved.

563 Preserved at Shildon – flickr

A few of the class at one time or another were fitted with Drummond-type boilers with the small dome and pop safety valves, which considerably spoiled their appearance.  The plain stove-pipe chimneys were also gradually replaced with Drummond’s pattern, but this process was slow, and No.679 carried its original chimney until May, 1929.

With their large driving wheels, the 7’ 1” series in particular were stately looking engines, and earned the nickname of ‘Highflyers’.

X2 – Driving wheels – 7’ 1”,  Bogie wheels – 3’ 10”,  Cylinders – 19”x 20”,  Pressure – 175 lb.,  LSWR and SR Classification – 1

T6 – Driving wheels – 7’ 1”,  Bogie wheels – 3’ 10”,  Cylinders – 19”x 26”,  Pressure – 175 lb.,  LSWR and SR Classification – 1

T3 – Driving wheels – 6’ 7”,  Bogie wheels – 3’ 7”,  Cylinders – 19”x 26”,  Pressure – 175 lb.,  LSWR and SR Classification – 1

X6 – Driving wheels – 6’ 7”,  Bogie wheels – 3’ 7”,  Cylinders – 19”x 26”,  Pressure – 175 lb.,  LSWR and SR Classification – 1

  4-4-0  LSWR X2 Class No 577

Commons is a freely licensed media file repository.

  This photo was taken from an old original photo we came across while helping to clear the house of a deceased friend. I have uploaded it to Flickr in the hope that it might be interesting to steam enthusiasts.

Date 30 April 2011, 11:08   Uploaded by oxyman Tony Hisgett from Birmingham, UK

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s