Daily Archives: May 2, 2012

Steam Locos of a Leisurely Era 1888 – Stirling 0-6-0T South Eastern Railway

Steam Locos of a Leisurely Era

1888 – Stirling  0-6-0T South Eastern Railway

No.1155, one of the unrebuilt engines, in 1933.

James Stirling’s shunting type for the SER, 25 engines being built between 1888 and 1898, numbered 10,47,69,70,77,107,124-8,147,152-5,174 and 335-42.  They had the typical Stirling domeless boilers and round cabs, and some remained in that condition to the end.  Others were rebuilt by Wainwright with domed boilers.  A few had very short chimneys for working over the Canterbury  and Whitstable branch, due to the restricted dimensions of the Tyler Hill tunnel.  The later survivors have been retained principally for working boat trains up the steeply graded Folkestone Harbour branch, a heavy train sometimes requiring three engines at the head of the train, and one banking.  In 1959 these duties were taken over by GWR pannier tanks, and the last of the South Eastern engines were taken out of service.  These were all of the domed variety, the last domeless ones having been scrapped in 1943.  All except No.341 survived to have 1000 added to their numbers by the SR, and many were renumbered as BR 31010, etc.

R1 Class Nº1010 in Southern Railway days, complete with shortened chimney.  Photograph: Mike Morant collection

As built – Driving wheels 5’ 2”,  Cylinders – 18”x 26”,  Pressure – 140 lb.,  Weight – 42½ tons,  SECR & SR classification – R

As rebuilt – Driving wheels 5’ 2”,  Cylinders – 18”x 26”,  Pressure – 160 lb.,  Weight – 46¾ tons,  SECR & SR classification – R1,  BR classification – 2F

 R Class Nº1070, date and location unknown. Note the height of the “normal” chimney when compared with that fitted to Nº1010 above.  Photograph: Mike Morant collection.

 

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