Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era 1888 – North Eastern Railway 4-2-2

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era

 1888 – North Eastern Railway 4-2-2

There were two classes of these engines, the first of which came out in 1888 and, following on the Midland Johnson 4-2-2s of1887, continued the grief popularity of this type for express working which was followed by other lines until 1901.

The North Eastern engines were all built as Worsdell-von Borries 2-cylinder compounds, but although moderately successful in that form all were converted to simple expansion within a few years.  The 7’ 7” engines in particular had trouble with the steam chests, which owing to restrictions of space had to be placed outside the frames, the valves being worked by rocking levers.  These were reconstructed in 1894-5, the 7’ 0” engines lasted as compounds until 1900-2.  The first lot, with 7’ 0” driving wheels, were numbered 1326-30 and 1527-31, and they were built between 1888 and 1890.  The second version with 7’ 7” wheels, Nos.1517-26, came out in 1889 and 1890.  They did many years of useful service, but all were broken up between 1918 and1920.

Dimensions

As compound – Driving wheels – 7’ 0”,  Cylinders – (1HP) 18”x 24”, (1LP) 26”x 24”,  Pressure – 175 lb.,  Weight – 43¾ tons,  NER Classification – I

Simple – Driving wheels – 7’ 0”,  Cylinders – (2) 18”x 24”, Pressure – 175 lb.,  Weight – 43¾ tons,  NER Classification – I

Compound – Driving wheels – 7’ 7”,  Cylinders – (1HP) 20”x 24”, (1LP) 28”x 24”,  Pressure – 175 lb.,  Weight – 46¾ tons,  NER Classification – J

Simple – Driving wheels – 7’ 7”,  Cylinders – (2) 19”x 24”, Pressure – 175 lb.,  Weight – 47 tons,  NER Classification – JIllustration: No.1526 when running as a compound.  Note the outside steam chests.

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