Steam Locos of a Leisurely Era 1884 Wordsell 2-4-2T Great Eastern Railway

Steam Locos of a Leisurely Era

1884 Wordsell 2-4-2T

Great Eastern RailwayNo.794, as first renumbered LNER 794E, in 1925.

This class, introduced by T.W.Worsdell in 1884, constituted for very many years the principal type of engine for the very heavy suburban traffic of the GER and was continued with some modifications by J. and S.D.Holden right up to 1912, by which time there were 220 of them, of four classes.

Worsdell’s engines were Nos.650-79, built in 1884-6, and were followed by ten in 1886-7 after J.Holden had succeeded him, Nos.791-800.  Fifty somewhat larger engines, Nos.1040-9 and 1060-99, appeared between 1893 and 1902, and differed slightly from all the rest, in having larger driving wheels and outside axle boxes to the leading and trailing wheels.  This class was used more on the East Anglian lines than in the London area.

From 1903 to 1909 more of the original design appeared, Nos.71-80, 91-111, 170-89, 211-25, 572-91, and 780-99, whilst finally in 1911 there came Nos.1-10 and 61-70.  These last had side window cabs, and were fitted with copper-capped chimneys.  All the others had had the plain stove-pipe variety, but most of these were replaced in later years.  Some of the engines were fitted with condensing apparatus.  Many of the earlier ones were later rebuilt with increased boiler pressure.7233 – LNER Encyclopedia

The original 650-79 were all scrapped by 1929, but no more went until 1936 and most of them survived the war.  Under the 1946 renumbering scheme they became 7114-7239 and over a hundred of the survived to be absorbed into BR stock in 1948, many of them receiving 60000 numbers.  The class finally became extinct in 1958.  They were usually known by the nickname of ‘Gobblers’, derived from the fact that the initial engines were heavy on coal, said to be as a result of their being fitted with Joy’s valve gear, which did not suit them, and which was abandoned in the later engines.  The nickname, however, later became loosely applied to the whole class.

1884-1909 series – Driving wheels – 5’ 4”,  Cylinders – 17½”x 24”,  Pressure – 160 lb.,  Tractive effort – 15618 lb.,  Weight – 53 tons 19cwt,  GER classification – M15,  LNER classification – F4,  BR classification – 1MT

1903 series rebuilt – Driving wheels – 5’ 4”,  Cylinders – 17½”x 24”,  Pressure – 180 lb.,  Tractive effort – 17571 lb.,  Weight – 53 tons 19cwt,  GER classification – M15,  LNER classification – F5,  BR classification – 1MT

Nos.1040-1049, 1060-99 – Driving wheels – 5’ 8”,  Cylinders – 17½”x 24”,  Pressure – 160 lb.,  Tractive effort – 14709 lb.,  Weight – 58 tons 12cwt,  GER classification – C32,  LNER classification – F3,  BR classification – 1MT

1911-12    series – Driving wheels – 5’ 4”,  Cylinders – 17½”x 24”,  Pressure – 180 lb.,  Tractive effort – 17571 lb.,  Weight – 56 tons 9cwt,  GER classification – G69,  LNER classification – F6,  BR classification – 1MTEx-Great Eastern 2-4-2T at Cambridge Locomotive Depot View westward, the main Shed being to the left. No. 67236 was one of the F6 2-4-2T’s, an enlarged Holden version of the Worsdell F4/F5 tank engines for London suburban services, which were all dispersed into the country after World War Two on the extension of the LPTB Central Line into NE London. (Note the absence of any ownership designation). Date 28 February 1951 Source From geograph.org.uk Author Ben Brooksbank Permission (Reusing this file)   Creative Commons Attribution Share-alike license 2.0

 

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