Steam Locos of a Leisurely Era 1870 – Stirling 0-4-2 – Glasgow & South Western Railway

Steam Locos of a Leisurely Era

1870 – Stirling 0-4-2 – Glasgow & South Western Railway

These engines were built in considerable numbers in the 1860s and 1870s by both Patrick Stirling and his brother James, who succeeded him on the G & SWR when the former went to the Great Northern, They were probably the first engines coming within the modern definition of ‘mixed traffic’ locomotives, in being designed specially to cover a wide range of duties.  Patrick Stirling built a large number of similar engines after he went to the Great Northern, and the idea was taken up later by Adams of the LSWR, adopting the same wheel arrangement, but very few railways of the nineteenth century went in for mixed traffic engines on a general scale.

James Stirling’s engines came out in several batches between 1870 and 1878, differing slightly in dimensions and detail.  55 of them survived to be taken into LMS stock in 1923 as Nos. 17021-75, but many were scrapped without actually carrying their new numbers.  The last ones in traffic survived until 1930.

Originally constructed with the typical Stirling domeless boiler and round cab, a good many of them had been rebuilt in the early years of the 20th century by Manson and boilers carrying domes and a slightly more commodious type of cab.Illustration – No. 17066 as rebuilt, at Hurlford in 1928

Unrebuilt domeless engines

Driving wheels – 5’ 7”,  Cylinders – 17”x 24” (18” x 26” in some engines),  Trailing wheels – 3’ 7”,  Pressure – 130 lb,  Tractive effort – 11,439 lb. (14,000 in some),  Weight 32 tons 2 cwt (33 tons 5 cwt).

Reboilered engines

Driving wheels – 5’ 7”,  Cylinders – 18”x 26”,  Trailing wheels – 3’ 7”,  Pressure – 140 lb.,  Tractive effort – 14,962 lb.,  Weight – 34 tons 16cwt.

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