Monthly Archives: October 2011

GCR 567 Locomotive Group and the MSL Coach

One of the wooden coaches in the Heritage Centre, at present undergoing a cosmetic reatoration, would fit in with the Edwardian train mentioned, but hopefully will eventually run as part of a wooden set at Chasewater.

MANCHESTER, SHEFFIELD & LINCOLN RAILWAY COACH

This six wheel Composite Brake Coach was built in 1890 at Gorton.

The Manchester, Sheffield & Lincoln Railway became part of the Great Central Railway connecting it to London (Marylebone) at about the turn of the century, and later became the L.N.E.R. The carriage was used on the Easingwold Light Railway near York until retired in 1949, then left on a siding. The Railway Preservation Society rescued the coach in the 1960s and stored it for restoration. This vehicle came to Chasewater and is at present undergoing a cosmetic restoration.  One side is now almost ready for a top coat of paint.

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The Chasewater Railway Model Railway Group and two Exhibitions

The Chasewater Railway Model Railway Group and two ExhibitionsA stroll along the platform and a turn towards the Tri Rail shop takes you to Platform 1 and the much improved Bric-a-Brac shop and the Model Railway coach. The Model Railway Group is still using whatever funds are available to improve and extend the rolling stock.

Now, at the end of October, looking towards Christmas and the Santa Specials with 2 layouts in the Heritage Centre. One will be a small ‘00’ gauge and the other, a more extensive ‘G’ gauge layout, the base for which is now being put together.

Coming very shortly, the Burton Modelrailex 2011,

November 6th 2011 at Burton Albion FC, Pirelli Stadium, Princess Way Burton-on-Trent, DE13 0AR.

Full details below:Later in November comes the big one at the NEC – Warley National 2011,  Sat and Sun 19th and 20th

147 – Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces – From Chasewater News Spring 1992 – Part 3

147 – Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces – From Chasewater News Spring 1992 – Part 3

Mission Impossible – Rob Duffill

This is my first report after being elected to the post of Commercial Manager in December, and I now have the honour of trying to maximise our income at Chasewater, both on and off site.  This is the job in a nutshell, and make no mistake, without an increase in income we cannot achieve our goals in other areas, however desirable, well planned or good value for money.  The task is difficult, but the successful outcome very rewarding and I am afraid it will mean asking members to help out on occasions and do jobs they do not fully enjoy.  Please remember if you spend a couple of hours for example, collecting entry fees at the gate, how much more you can enjoy the rest of the time because we can afford another project that really does interest you.I joined the group in 1968 and was elected to the Committee of the then Society in 1971.  Following a split up of ideas and members, I did not re-stand in 1974.  I have, over 23 years, seen the ups and downs and plodding alongs at Chasewater and like to think that all this gives me an insight into what is needed as we are definitely on the up, and have been for several years.

As we get bigger and better we will need to change practices to cope with demand and the present working members at Chasewater seem to me quite capable of really making great strides forward.  As I look around me I see the track extension (you now need good eyesight!) and the general improvement to stock and site.  The shop and buffet raise large and regular income and will need your occasional support as the regulars need a change from time to time.

What plans do we have?  In the short term we can only expand what we did last year.  We will be a success if we raise more income at each event and we all have a critical role:  It’s down to the members.  We will succeed if we pull together and remember that we need the public to pay for our enjoyment of our hobby.

I hope to highlight certain aspects of the commercial side in future magazines, for example, plans for a mobile sales stand.

If anyone has any suggestions for raising money or showing the flag (publicity) please contact me, as we must, as cheaply as possible, raise the awareness of the public that we exist, are different and that they ought to visit, and, having visited, come again because they liked it so much.  Mission Impossible perhaps – but we’ll see at the next AGM in 12 months time.

Stop Press

Pic – Nigel Canning

One of our members, Mike Wood, has bought an ex-Great Western Railway ‘Fruit D’ van from British Rail, and at the end of March it was delivered to Chasewater.  The Van, which is vacuum braked and steam heated, was run on April 11th as part of a demonstration goods train fro the Industrial Railway Society.

16 Ton Mineral Wagon – Arthur Edwards

Steve Forrest and I bought this item of rolling stock from the CLR Co. on the understanding that it will remain on CLR metals.Arthur and Steve pause briefly whilst shovelling coal dust and slack out of the wagon prior to chipping rust from the bodywork. – Nigel Canning

The underframes have already been doused with old engine oil to help with their preservation, and the bodywork is in exceptionally good condition considering its age, built in 1957 I think.  At present it is in British Coal green, but we aim to re-paint it into the classic colours of grey and black with white sloping stripe down one corner.

 The idea behind obtaining this and the 21 tonner was to help in the rebuilding of the causeway, but the 16 tonner has been put on our line backwards, that is, the end opening door  is at the wrong end.

Over the next few Saturdays we, that is, possibly Tony and I and maybe Dave and young Chris, aim to release the jammed side doors and the one end door followed possibly by the re-paint in the coming months.

Maybe one day there will be the Maunsell brake van, our 16 tonner, followed by the wooden bodied coal truck, possibly the Midland crane, and the Great Western Toad hauled by a loco not seen in steam for many a year, ‘Colin McAndrew’.  Our own freight train!

Moving Pictures

The slide and film show held at Chasewater during January was well attended and a great success.  The subject was ‘Chasewater in the Early 1970s’ and featured a variety of films and colour slides by Andrew Louch and Rob Duffill.

All of our departments were left drooling by some of the photos which stand as a great tribute to the pioneer members at Chasewater.  For a variety of reasons the early promise of success came to nothing, and much of the progress made was lost during the 1980s.  While certain aspects of Chasewater have still to reach the level attained in the early days, it is pleasing to see that real progress is once again being made, and on a far more professional level than ever before.

The opening shots of the first film saw diesels 20 and 21 shunting some delightful wooden wagons at what is now Brownhills West Station.  Although some of those wagons have now gone, it is great to know that No.21 is undergoing restoration in the shed and will one day burst into life once more.  No.20, which is nominally in working order, is on loan to the Bass Museum, Burton-on-Trent, although it may one day return to Chasewater.

Another item of nostalgia was a wonderful film of our trains at the far end of the line across the causeway and round near the old workshops.  This provoked much discussion, and we have now approached British Coal who own these now disused buildings with a view to acquiring them for our own use.  First signs are encouraging and we may have some good news to report soon.

The late lamented ‘Norton Branch’ also featured in the cine film show.  This ‘Norton Branch’ ran from our current line, before the causeway (from Brownhills West) in between the bungalows and the Swag pool round to Norton East Road, and ultimately into Conduit No.3 Pit (Jerome’s).  The loss of this section of the line was a sad blow, but it is interesting to note that we do still lease the track bed.  Who knows?  Perhaps we may one day rebuild that line.

The Carriage & Wagon department also had a lot to think about.  Film of a beautifully restored Maryport, and the MSL caused quite a stir.  The now derelict ‘slum’ and Midland crane also brought gasps from a few people.  There was also a message for those who cared to read it.  Two coaches, the LNWR TPO and the SECR ‘birdcage brake’ also appeared on the film.. Both of these fine carriages left Chasewater many years ago because it was felt that they would stand a better chance of restoration elsewhere.  They are, in fact, both still derelict.  So all those who want to dispose of our old coaches, take note!

Another fine vehicle was the E1, sold to Cranmore in the 1970s.  This loco has had something like £40,000 spent on it and has yet to enter service on the east Somerset line.  (It has steamed since that, but if it had stayed at Chasewater there was no £40,000 to spend on it!).

Other engines seen working included ‘Invicta’ and the venerable Neilson ‘Alfred Paget’.  Once again our loco department is making progress, and these engines may one day receive the attention they require. – P.Aldridge

 (Invicta has long since left, and poor Alfred is still waiting!)

146 – Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces – From Chasewater News Spring 1992 – Part 2

146 – Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces – From Chasewater News Spring 1992 – Part 2

Permanent Way News

The majority of the work carried out in this department is still the extending of the line towards the causeway.  Around half a dozen people are now regularly involved in the work and a dozen or so 60 foot lengths of track have been added to the existing extension.Work has been greatly speeded up by the use of the JCB which by clearing the track bed, moving rails and sleepers and depositing ballast exactly where it is needed has left the track gang free to lay track rather than spend hours, or even weeks, just shovelling.  Accordingly, the lads would like to thank Ian Buswell for his superb driving of this ’52 manpower’ machine.

The JCB has also filled the breach in the causeway, and was driven across to the other side in triumph on 8th March where work then began on widening the trackbed opposite the existing brick platform so that a run round loop can eventually be installed.

Walsall Council have now agreed to provide and dump ‘road scrapings’ to widen the causeway in the very near future.  It is hoped that enough of this material will be available to provide sufficient width for a footpath next to the railway.

Whilst progress on the track so far has been relatively rapid, our supply of track materials is likely to run out before the causeway is reached.  If anyone knows where we could obtain rail chairs, keys, fishplates and bolts, or even rail cheaply could they please contact the PW department at Chasewater?

Carriage & Wagon News

Maryport & Carlisle six-wheel coach – This vehicle remains sheeted up, protected against the weather,

Manchester, Sheffield & Lincoln six-wheel coach – This vehicle has also remained sheeted up.

Great Eastern six wheel passenger brake – This coach has with one almighty pull rotated its wheels shedding rust from its brake blocks accumulated since its last move in 1977.  The new position has made access easy, and working on cutting and fitting the missing panels, undercoating and top glossing has already been completed leaving only a small section around the door areas.  The temporary two-tone blue will remain, sealing the wooden body for some time.  The Great Eastern coach, once left forlornly down in the undergrowth to rot, now boasts to be the most used vehicle on our railway.  It provides a hearth and meeting place at Brownhills West for early arrivals on Saturday and Sunday, warm overnight accommodation, a place to make a hot drink, and about three times a day, a debating room.

CCCC Brake Van – Referred to in magazines as a ’CRC’ Brake Van but it was in fact from Cannock Chase Colliery Co., not Cannock & Rugeley Colliery.  Keith has now sealed the roof, replaced the wooden blanks with Perspex windows, re-timbered some of the verandah planking and fitted lids to the inside cabin lockers.

Midland four-wheel passenger brake – This vehicle has remained sheeted up over the winter, but inspection has revealed that even though the tarpaulin was in good condition and fitted snugly, it didn’t stop all the rain from entering the coach.  Thus began the Carriage & Wagon Shed (planning permission exempt).

Over the Christmas period an experiment was carried out to make a canopy support strong enough to carry the weight of a tarpaulin and snow, and rigid enough to remain intact against our famous Chase winds.  A free standing structure made of scaffolding and point rodding looked good on paper, but in reality the constant adjustment of the uprights to keep everything square was a problem.  The damn thing was just walking slowly into the woods!  The use of two bracing cables across the roof of the Great Eastern coach and secured down to the rail did the trick.  After another two weekends work the structure was complete and awaiting tarpaulins.

A shunt round now is needed to get maximum protection from the weather for perhaps the Midland, or, with John Elsley’s consent the MS & L or Hudswell 431.

Maunsell Southern Brake van No.62861 – This van has received attention to its roof, as the flaking top skin of bitumen had exposed the Hessian backing in places allowing leakage.  These have been re-sealed, and during the last rain storm the patches seemed to be weather tight.

Cadbury Van – This has now become a useful workshop with temporary mains power and lighting, and is used frequently by our brightest and best young member, Chris Hatton.  (If only we had another ten like Chris our future would be certain).

Great Western Brake Vans – These vehicles are in service nearly every week on the permanent way train, the tool van kept tidy by Arthur, and the mess van kept warm by Arthur and Steve stoking up the pot-bellied stove.

16 Ton Mineral Wagon – With the help of Arthur, Steve, Jonathan Clegg and others, the coal has now been removed from the wagon and spread in the four-foot for use in our pot-bellied stoves.  One of the side doors has been freed off and the wheels and under-frames painted with oil.Derby Centre Car W59444 – The bodywork of this coach is being prepared for painting prior to its entering service coupled to the Wickham trailer at the start of the season.

Wickham Trailer E56171 – It is hoped that, with the agreement of the Railway Inspector, we will be propelling our trains from the opposite end this year, in which case the Guard (or second driver) will travel in this coach.  In view of this, a certain amount of refurbishment will be necessary in the driving compartment but otherwise the vehicle is in reasonable condition.

Gloucester Trailer E56301 – It is intended that this coach should remain out of service for a while until repair have been carried out.

Wickham Power car E50416 – The greatest step forward by the C & W dept recently has been the work carried out by new members Ken, Andy and Larry on this vehicle.  They have assisted Dave Whittle with the bodywork, but more importantly on the technical side of replacing batteries, rewiring, test running the engines, vacuum and air equipment, as well as interior restoration.  Working mid-week and Saturdays and Sundays, they forecast ‘the set’ will be available for service trains in the near future.  With Chris, Ken, Larry and Andy’s help this has certainly boosted the C & W dept’s hands-on membership team.  Dave Borthwick.Pictures by Dave Borthwick, Nigel Canning and Tony Wheeler.

Ecclesbourne Valley Railway – Announcing the Thames – Ecclesboune Express

Wirksworth, Idridgehay, Duffield, London St. Pancras Special.

Photo – Flickr/asw909

On Saturday 26th November a special two part train is running to London.

Departing Wirksworth at 07.15 and Idridgehay at 07.33, it is running to Duffield where passengers will cross over to the main line platform where East Midlands Trains will make a special stop on one of their London express services, departing at 08.07 and arriving at London St. Pancras at 10.06.

The return service will depart London at 18.25, arrive Duffield at 20.25 and after a quick change of train, arrive Idridgehay at 20.42 and Wirksworth at 21.00.

There is one set of fares for all stations:  The Adult Standard Return will cost £58.00, with a First Class option at £88.00.  Child, Senior, Student and Disabled Railcard holders pay £41.00 Standard Class and £61.00 First.

This is a very exciting new development for all at Eclesbourne and it is hoped to be the first of many.  Thanks to the great team at East Midlands Trains, passengers from Wirksworth, Idridgehay and Duffield will be able to go Christmas shopping in London without having to use their cars!

Tickets are limited and are expected to sell very quickly.  If you would like to learn more or book on line, go to the website:  http://www.e-v-r.com

145 – Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces – From Chasewater News Spring 1992 – Part 1

145 – Chasewater RailwayMuseum Bits & Pieces – From Chasewater News Spring 1992 – Part 1

Editorial Nigel Canning

A lot of progress has been made over the winter months at Chasewater to the extent that it is now very difficult to keep the news sections of the magazine updated before it is printed.  This is because there now seem to be a lot more people than ever before working regularly on our railway, and the effect of this is beginning to show.  The track extension is proceeding at a very impressive pace, and we are on the verge of having three steam locos available for running trains, and a choice of passenger and goods rolling stock in gradually improving condition.

Anyone wishing to help in any department on the railway will be most welcome at Chasewater this summer – if in doubt, please ask for details at the booking office.

Locomotive News

No.4 Asbestos – This loco finally passed its hydraulic test in March, and is now being re-assembled ready for steam testing.  A repaint is also being carried out so that the loco will re-enter service in green livery later in the year.

No.5 Sentinel – This loco has passed its annual visual boiler examination and was back in service on 11th April to work a special train for the Industrial Railway Society.  Trouble was again experienced with rust from the inside of the superheater coil being drawn up through the regulator box and blocking the steam supply to the Weir pump, steam brake and blower.  It is hoped that this will not become a regular occurrence otherwise our train service may suffer badly.

No.2 Lion – Progress on this loco has continued slowly, but following the recent delivery of the last of the long awaited new washout plugs the hydraulic test can now be carried out.  All of the copper pipe needed to replace that stolen a number of years ago has now been acquired and will shortly be bent and fitted.

S100 – The first of six pairs of axlebox hornguides have now been re-ground to a highly accurate mirror-like finish.  Work on the other five pairs is continuing.

Fowler – This loco has remained in service as our only working diesel, carrying out all shunting and works train duties.

DL7 – This loco has remained out of service with its engine partially stripped awaiting refurbishment of the cylinder heads.

No.21 Diesel – This loco has now been moved into the shed where work has continued on its restoration.  One major problem appears to be the radiator matrix which has rotted through and will require replacement.

Smith Rodley Crane – This was recently used to remove the saddle tank from Asbestos but has otherwise remained idle.

The E1 – B.J.Bull

E1  0-6-0T 110 leaves Mendip Vale for Cranmore  4/6/95. – John Chalcroft

When the former LBSCR loco was sold to three members of the East Somerset Railway and left Chasewater in 1978 for pastures new at Cranmore, it was agreed that we should receive regular updates on its restoration.

Following extensive (and expensive) repairs to just about every component part, the loco first steamed at Cranmore in July 1990.  This was a steam test minus tanks and a resultant fusible plug leak saw the fire dropped in order to affect repairs and try again another day.  Subsequent steam tests have found out other irritating problems – leaking pipework, regulator blowing past and so on.

The latest position gleaned from a phone conversation with the East Somerset Railway’s Barry Buckfield on 31st December, 1991 is that both tanks have been fitted, as has lagging and cladding, however a troublesome fusible plug has to be replaced, and valve setting is still to be carried out.  Sometime during 1992 the E1 will move under its own power for the first time in twenty nine years.

At one time it had been intended to restore the loco as British Railways 32110 in black livery which, of course, it never carried as it was sold by the Southern Railway to the Cannock and Rugeley Colliery Company in 1926.  The loco, it has now been decided, will be restored to traffic in Stroudley’s improved  engine green, although it will not carry the name ‘Burgundy’ associated with it during most of its LBSCR days.E1 Brian Rands1996

Once remaining work has been completed and running-in trials have taken place, the hundred and fifteen year-old will join that rare group of working centenarians in railway preservation.

Sisters, Sisters – P.Aldridge

While much of our collection at Chasewater is unique, some locomotives and carriages are similar to others preserved elsewhere.  Readers may be interested to know what is happening to these vehicles, and so here is a brief résumé –S100’s sister is at the Yorkshire Dales (sorry, Embsay Steam) Railway, and has sat derelict for many years, but during 1991 work started.  The loco, ‘140’, has been stripped down to its individual components, and with a large work force and plenty of money, progress is quite rapid.  New tanks, bunker and cab have now been built and the horn guides are being ground to something like the proper shape.  It is quite likely that ‘140’ will run again in 1994.H C 140 Embsay Charles Adams

Also at the YDR is ‘Annie’, a Peckett identical to our No.917.  This loco was in a very similar condition to ours, with a rotten tank and problems with the smokebox tubeplate.  Once again, this engine is likely to run in the next two years but it is difficult to see what use such a small engine would be at Embsay.  Perhaps we could borrow it!‘Annie’ Peckett 0-4-0ST – Pic, Simon Gott

Our long-suffering Gloucester DMU trailer is rapidly becoming an endangered species, as the West Somerset Railway have given up with its sister and sent it for scrap.  When DMUs were first preserved in the late sixties many enthusiasts complained, arguing that such vehicles were too commonplace to warrant preservation.  Now enthusiasts are complaining that the lines are disposing of these coaches.  (Being cynical, I expect they are the self-same people!)  It certainly proves that, as the old saying goes, nostalgia ain’t what it used to be!Gloucester DMU and Cravens DMU in early morning sun at Bishops Lydeard, West Somerset Railway, on 21 April 1987 – Photo by Stephen Edge

144 – Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces – From Chasewater News December 1991 – Part 3

144 – Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces – From Chasewater News December 1991 – Part 3

General News from the Line

Bric a Brac Stall – The stall is still running and making money for the railway.  Suitable items are always needed to maintain the stock, so if you can help please bring your donations to Brownhills West Station.

Station Buffet – The new buffet is still a great success, to the extent that Walsall Council would now like us to apply for planning permission for it.  The CLR Company will no doubt point out that this is a temporary building which we intend to dismantle as soon as we have made a fortune out of feeding the construction workers on the new M6 Toll motorway which will be built around it at some time in the future!Advertising – This year the railway has benefited from a bit of extra advertising.  The photos show the electronic scoreboard at Walsall FC’s Bescot Stadium.  One of our members, Dave Bathurst, has access to the control panel of this machine and regularly manages to advertise our events on the day before they happen.  Ours could well be the only preserved railway in the country to benefit in this way!!

Steve Organ has also been busy publicising the railway by being interviewed on local radio just before the October Transport Rally.  With this sort of coverage, our events can only become better attended, with the resultant upturn in CLR finances.

The New Platform – Arthur Edwards

The delivery of the new platform has been on the books at Chasewater since January, but through illness and the like had to be put off until September 28th, which was a Saturday.

So there I was going towards Frank Harvey’s house at 5.30 in the morning to be at the SVR at around 7.15am.  Frank picked me up at 5.40am and off we went towards Guymer’s to pick up a trailer and two drivers, Bullet and Ken.

After a cup of coffee we set off.  Bullet and Ken took the two trailers which had been loaded the previous day back to the CLR, whilst Frank and I waited for the SVR crane driver to appear.  We also had Frank’s son Francis and daughter Ruth with us, and while we waited, Flying Scotsman rolled in.  Frank and Francis got on the footplate to have a gander while Scotsman watered up and saw City of Truro which was also there.

The SVR crane driver was a policeman on night shift, so it was only fair that he had some sleep before he came.  It took some 2½ hours to load up, and in the meantime down came the rain.  By the time we were loaded we were both soaked to the skin.

We finally arrived back on CLR territory at 6.55pm to the welcome sight of the mobile crane waiting for us.

I though it wise to include a credit list of those who helped us, so here goes:  Paul Whittaker, his son Kane, and brother-in-law Barry, who was the instigator in us getting a Hy-Ab.  Credit must also go to our own lorry driver, Frank Harvey, who borrowed the original Hy-Ab from a workmate.

Thanks must go to Guymer’s Transport, especially their manager, Mr.S.Ashton, for whose help we are most indebted.

Finally to everyone who helped, even in the pouring rain and to Dave Borthwick for a lift home.

After following the ‘New Platform Saga’ for a number of magazines, and searching for pictures of it, sadly I found that it was never erected at Chasewater.  I am not sure what happened to it but one theory is that it ended up at Titley Junction.

Canal News – Volunteers needed to ‘make a difference’ on Coventry Canal

Volunteers needed to ‘make a difference’ on Coventry Canal

Posted by Waterway Watcher on October 20th, 2011

19 October 2011

Local volunteers are being called upon to help make the Coventry Canal a cleaner, greener place to visit by taking part in a canal clean-up.

Potential volunteers are being encouraged to give up just a few hours on Make a Difference Day on 29th October to help make the canal a more welcoming place for people and wildlife.

The activity, organised by Voluntary Action Coventry and British Waterways (BW), will see volunteers clearing litter from the towpath and even taking to a BW workboat to clear litter from the water and areas not accessible by foot.

Make a Difference Day is organised by CSV, the UK’s leading volunteering and training charity, and provides thousands of people across the country with the opportunity to try out volunteering. More than three quarters of a million people have taken part since the launch of CSV Make a Difference Day in 1996, and thousands more are expected to give time rather than money to improve their local community this year.

Stuart Collins, volunteer leader for British Waterways, said; “We’re looking forward to taking part in Make a Difference Day. We’re keen for local communities to play a more active role in caring for their local canal and hopefully this event will give them a taste of the great sense of achievement at improving their local environment as well as the opportunity to meet new people and hopefully have some fun”.

Chris Clough, Volunteer Centre Support Officer, said; “This is a great way to get involved and ‘make a difference’ in Coventry. We are hoping that this event will lead to more regular events, especially in the run-up to the Olympics coming to Coventry next year. We’re hoping that volunteers can play a big part in making the towpaths more accessible for cyclists and walkers”.The canal clean-up will be taking place between 10am and 3pm on Saturday 29th October at the Canal Basin, Coventry and Swan Lane. Anyone wishing to take part in the clean-up can do so by contacting The Volunteer Centre Coventry who are located at 26 City Arcade, Coventry, CV1 3HW (opposite Argos) on 024 7622 0381 or volunteering@vacoventry.org.uk or register online at http://www.do-it.org.uk.

Via Newsroom – British Waterways.

The Sidings Tea Room, Industrial Railway Society visit plus other news

On 21st October 2011 Chasewater Railway were hosts to a visit by members of the Industrial Railway Society, including Rosalind Sirr, daughter of the late Eric Tonks, who put together the collection of locomotive nameplates, later donated to the Industrial Railway Society, who, in turn, loaned the collection to the Chasewater Railway Museum.The visit opened with tea and biscuits and a slide show on the first floor of the Museum.This was followed by a train ride behind Asbestos, the full length of the line – not cut off at the causeway as it was on the previous visit, for the IRS AGM when the causeway was closed to allow for a culvert to be built into it.Asbestos in Chasewater Heaths Station.

Ready to go.On return to Brownhills West all were treated to an absolutely first class buffet, put on by the new Hospitality Manager, Craig Wilkinson and his staff in the Sidings Tea Room, I cannot remember having a better buffet anywhere! I tried most of the items on offer – all delicious – taking care to leave room for at least two sweets (I wish I could have eaten more!)Anyone thinking of trying the Sunday Carvery which starts on 23rd October should be in for a real treat!

Derek Hayward brought along his latest acquisition – a beautiful Bassett Lowke ‘0’ gauge model Peckett.

This model is available in two colours, the red one is called ‘Wenman’ and the green ‘Joseph’.

Tailpiece – the gruesome twosome!

The Sidings Tea Room, Brownhills West Station

From 23rd October, under new management –

The Sidings Tea Room