Category Archives: Steam Locomotive Classes of a Leisurely Era

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era – 1933 – ‘Princess’ Pacifics London Midland & Scottish Railway

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era
1933 – ‘Princess’ Pacifics
London Midland & Scottish Railway

Princess Louise in 1948 at first temporarily numbered M6206 and later 46206, in 1948

Princess Louise at first temporarily numbered M6206 and later 46206, in 1948

One of Mr. (later Sir) William Stanier’s first designs after his appointment as Chief Mechanical Engineer of the LMS. Stanier came from the Great Western, and introduced a number of features of that Company’s practice to the LMS for the first time, including the use of a taper boiler. His first two Pacifics, Nos. 6200 ‘The Princess Royal’ and 6201 ‘Princess Elizabeth, which appeared in 1933, were given thorough trials before any more were built, after which ten similar engines, Nos.6203-12 came out in 1935 with slight modifications following the experience gained with the first two engines, chief amongst these was an increase in the superheater heating surface. The four cylinders on this class has each its own independent set of Walschaert valve gear, but No.6205 later had its inside sets replaced by rocking levers actuated from the outside pair. As might have been expected, these locomotives soon proved themselves to be greatly superior to anything previously seen on the North Western main line. In 1936, in anticipation of the introduction of a high speed service between London and Glasgow, No.6201 was tested with a light load of 230 tons, seven coaches, and succeeded in covering the distance of 401½ miles, non-stop, in the remarkable time of 353½ minutes.

Maud
Concurrently with Nos. 6203-12, there appeared No.6202, which differed radically from its sisters. The boiler, wheels, etc., were identical, but in place of the normal cylinders and reciprocating motion it was propelled by turbines, a large one on the left hand side of the engine, for forward motion, and a smaller one on the right hand for reverse running. It was not the first turbine driven locomotive in this country, other experiments in this direction having been made in the 1920s, but it was undoubtedly the only successful turbine design to appear. Many snags were encountered and the engine spent a good proportion of its life in the works undergoing modifications, but nevertheless when it was in service it was a very good engine, and performed work equal to that of its orthodox sisters. It was a beautiful machine to see in action, with its soft purr and even torque, which resulted in almost complete absence of slipping, even with the heaviest load, a fault to which most ‘Pacifics’ designs are particularly prone.

Victoria
It ran as a turbine until 1952, when it was rebuilt with a normal 4-cylinder propulsion. Previously nameless, it now became ‘Princess Anne’, but its life under its new metamorphosis was exceedingly short, as it was involved in the disastrous Harrow accident in that year, and damaged beyond repair. All the other ‘Princesses, now BR Nos. 46200, 46201 and 46203-12, were in active service in 1959.

Anne Turbine
‘Princess’ class – Driving wheels – 6’ 6”, Cylinders – 16¼”x 28”, Pressure – 250 lb., Tractive effort – 40285 lb., Weight – 104½ tons, BR classification – 8P
No.6202 – Driving wheels – 6’ 6”, Cylinders – N/A, Pressure – 250 lb., Tractive effort –N/A., Weight – 110½ tons, BR classification – N/A

Anne rebuilt

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era – 1932 – 0-4-2T Great Western Railway

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era

1932 – 0-4-2T

Great Western Railway

No.1425 with a trailer, as running in 1947

No.1425 with a trailer, as running in 1947

These engines were in effect a modernised version of a very much older class dating back to 1868, the first 54 of which were built as saddle tanks, but later converted to side tanks to conform with the subsequent engines. In all 165 had been constructed between 1868 and 1897, and many of them were still in service in the 1930s, but in need of renewal. It became a common practice on the GWR in later years to replace older engines with completely new ones of the same basic design, instead of the more usual method of giving the original machines extensive overhaul or rebuilding. Latterly this method was applied to some even comparatively modern classes.

1420
In this instance the old 0-4-2Ts were replaced by a series of 95 new engines, Nos.4800-74, which were provided with pull-and-push apparatus, and Nos.5800-19, which were not motor fitted. The most noticeable features in the new engines when compared to the old ones were an extended smokebox and a more modern cab, but they were not superheated. All were built between 1932 and 1936. They replaced their predecessors on the numerous branch lines of the Great Western and in some cases stopping trains along the main lines. With their loads of one or two coaches, sufficient for the local needs which they served, they were very efficient and economical in operation. They were, moreover, quick in acceleration and could show a surprising turn of speed. The advent of the diesel railcar and the closing of many branch lines had rendered many of them redundant, and from 1956 onwards they began to be taken out of service. Nos.4800-74 were renumbered 1400-74 in 1946.

5816

Driving wheels – 5′ 2″,  Cylinders – 16″x 24″,  Pressure – 165 lb.,  Tractive effort – 13900 lb.,  Weight – 41 tons 6 cwt.,  BR classification – 1P

1465

The Great Goodbye – Shildon, February 2014

The Great Goodbye – A4 locos at Shildon, 2014

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era – 1932 – 4-4-0 Compounds Great Northern Railway of Ireland

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era

1932 – 4-4-0 Compounds

Great Northern Railway of Ireland

No.86 'Peregine' in 1937 after receiving the then new blue livery

No.86 ‘Peregine’ in 1937 after receiving the then new blue livery

For working the fast expresses over the GNR main line between Dublin and Belfast, the timings of which it was desired to accelerate, G.T.Glover built five 3-cylinder compound 4-4-0s in 1932. This was made possible by reconstructing the Boyne viaduct so as to permit a heavier axle loading which in the new engines amounted to 22 tons. They were built with round-topped boilers with the unusually high working pressure of 250 lb. per square inch, but these were latterly replaced with Belpaire type boilers with reduced pressure. In some ways they followed the design of the well-known Midland compounds. It was the last new compound design to appear in the British Isles. For many years these engines formed the mainstay in working the somewhat difficult schedules of the tightly timed expresses, but were superseded in 1948 by five new somewhat similar engines employing simple propulsion instead of compound, and more recently, by diesel railcars.
They were numbered 83-7, and were named ‘Eagle’, ‘Falcon’, ‘Merlin’, ‘Peregrine’ and ‘Kestrel’, and like so many engines for this railway, came from the works of Beyer Peacock & Co.

Driving wheels – 6’ 7” , Cylinders – 1 HP inside: 17¼”x 26”, 2 HP outside: 19”x 26”, Pressure – 250 lb., (later reduced to 215 lb.), – Tractive effort – 23760 lb., (later reduced to 20435 lb., Classification – W

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era – American Locomotive Company No.17 – 1929

Steam Locomotives of a leisurely Era

American Locomotive Company No.17 – 1929

85-year-old steam engine ready to roll again in Lewis County

This engine is one of 6 left and The only one running. Its runs on recycled motor oil. Smells like a chippy! (David Jackson’s comment NOT Chasewaterstuff’s!  lol)20140615_144803 Photo – David Jackson – Wellington, England

 

85-year-old steam engine ready to roll again in Lewis County
After three years of work and more than $100,000, volunteers and a handful of employees the Mt. Rainier Scenic Railroad in Mineral, Lewis County, restored an antique locomotive just in time for tourist season.

By Dameon Pesanti
The (Centralia) Chronicle

Bob HarbisonCourtesy of Bob Harbison
Locomotive No. 17 pulls the Mt. Rainier Scenic Railroad’s Santa train through a wintry landscape near Elbe, Pierce County. Built in 1929, No. 17 was the last of the model 2-8-2T manufactured by American Locomotive.

Even though it’s 85 years old, you would swear the 2-8-2T, No. 17 locomotive just rolled off the assembly line.
After three years of work and more than $100,000, volunteers and a handful of employees of the Mt. Rainier Scenic Railroad (MRSR) in Mineral, Lewis County, restored the antique locomotive just in time for tourist season.
“It’s basically a brand-new engine,” MRSR Executive Director Wayne Rankin said. “We overhauled just about everything and built a lot of the parts by hand.”
No. 17 is truly one of a kind.
Built in 1929, it was the last of the model 2-8-2T manufactured by American Locomotive. Out of the 22 produced, just six are in existence and only the No. 17 is still rolling.
New, it sold for about $25,000. Today, it is valued at about $500,000.
Quick and fuel efficient, it lived its life as a workhorse of the logging industry in Oregon and California, towing log cars to and from forests and sawmills. In the 1940s, an epic forest fire burned away the track and two railroad bridges and left it stranded in a mountainous part of the redwood forest.
It sat for nearly 25 years before an intrepid logger built a road to the 17, disassembled it and hauled it to his own sawmill. He later ran a tourist railroad until the oil embargo of the 1970s wiped out his customer base and he was forced to sell. Tacoma lumberman and MRSR founder Tom Murray Jr. bought the No. 17 and two other engines. Now it will live out its days hauling tourists on the weekends.
The Federal Railway Administration (FRA) requires locomotive boilers be rebuilt every 15 years. Before the FRA rewrote the rules in 2000, steam-engine boilers had to be rebuilt every five years to the tune of $60,00-$100,000 each.
But those regulations were based on steel and welding technology from the 1920s. Modern material manufacturing and testing enabled the FRA to stretch out rebuilds to every 15 years.
Those changes are making it easier for tourist railways and nonprofits such as MRSR to reignite the boilers on steam engines throughout the United States, but the lack of knowledgeable manpower is keeping it difficult.
Brian Wise led the restoration efforts for the 2-8-2T and is the director of operations and restorations at the MRSR. He’s spent most of his life around trains.
Finding parts for antiquated locomotives is relatively easy. Metal plumbing is available everywhere, and there’s a couple businesses that specialize in old steam engines. The rest could be made in-house. It’s the knowledge that’s hard to come by.
“Most anybody can measure, figure out the clearance, and put grease on things, but what’s hard is to find a person that really understands how the parts work together in harmony and how a steam locomotive is supposed to run,” Wise said. “I’m fearful that not enough 20-somethings are around to learn how to do this.”

http://seattletimes.com/ABPub/zoom/html/2023532342.html

20140615_144753Photo – David Jackson – Wellington, England

vintage everyday: Black & White Photographs of Transport in the Past

vintage everyday: Black & White Photographs of Transport in the Past.

Steam Locomotives of a More Leisurely Era – 1930 – ‘Schools’ Class – Southern Railway

Steam Locomotives of a More Leisurely Era

1930 – ‘Schools’ Class

Southern Railway

No.936 Cranleigh as running in 1936

No.936 Cranleigh as running in 1936

Maunsell’s last design of express passenger engines and in many ways his finest achievement. The need had been felt for a locomotive with approximately the same haulage capacity as the ‘King Arthurs’ but with greater route availability, particularly as regards the SECR Hastings line with its restricted loading gauge. The resulting ‘Schools’ class may be in some ways regarded as a 4-4-0 version of the ‘Lord Nelsons’, with two important differences, the use of three cylinders instead of four, and of a round-topped firebox in place of the Belpaire. The new engines quickly showed themselves as coming up to all expectations. In later years they did even more than had been anticipated when they were put to work on the heavy expresses between Waterloo and Bournemouth after being displaced to some extent from the South Eastern section, for which they were originally designed. They also did fine work over the Portsmouth road before electrification. With a tractive effort of only slightly less than the 4-6-0 ‘King Arthurs’, they were the most powerful and one of the most successful 4-4-0 designs ever built in this country.

30912
They were incidentally the last new design of that wheel arrangement in Great Britain, although two others were yet to appear on the GNR of Ireland.
Like the ‘King Arthurs’, they soon had to be fitted with smoke deflectors, and about half of them were fitted with double blast pipes necessitating wide chimneys with sorry results to their appearance.
In all, forty were built, Nos.900-9 in 1930, 910-14 in 1932, 915-24 in 1933 and 925-39 in 1934-5. They were named after public schools. They were all still in service in 1959 as Nos.30900-39.
Driving wheels – 6’ 7”, Cylinders (3) – 16½”x 26”, Pressure – 220 lb., Tractive effort – 25135 lb., Weight – 67 tons 2 cwt., SR classification – V, BR classification – 5P

30934

Steam Locomotives of a More Leisurely Era – 1927 – ‘Royal Scots’ – LMS

Steam Locomotives of a More Leisurely Era

1927 – ‘Royal Scots’

LMS

No.6100 in 1947 before rebuilding

No.6100 in 1947 before rebuilding

By 1926 the need for a large express engine for the West Coast route was becoming a pressing problem, and Sir Henry Fowler had already prepared plans both for a 3-cylinder compound 4-6-0 and a 4-cylinder compound Pacific. Unfortunately these highly promising designs were vetoed by the Operating Department, and as new engines were needed in a hurry recourse was had to a 3-cylinder simple 4-6-0. Accordingly the well-known ‘Royal Scot’ class appeared, the first fifty, Nos.6100-49 all coming out in 1927, followed by Nos.6150-69 in 1930. A further experimental engine, No.6399 ‘Fury’, was also built in 1930, with a compound super pressure boiler, a German design known as the Schmidt-Henshel type, a complicated affair with varying pressures, the maximum being no less than 900 lb. per square inch. Unfortunately the boiler burst on trial and the engine was rebuilt with a taper boiler in 1935, becoming N.6170 ‘British Legion’. Eventually all of the ‘Royal Scots’, which had originally been constructed with parallel boilers, were rebuilt in a similar manner, the complete class now running as BR 46100-70.

1
In 1933 No.6152 exchanged name and number with No.6100, and as the ‘Royal Scot’ was sent to the USA for exhibition at Chicago. The numbers were not changed back on its return, and No.46100 is therefore the same engine, although since rebuilt with taper boiler, as went to America. This precedent was not later followed in the case of the Pacific ‘Coronation’. Under rebuilding, the ‘Royal Scot’ carried the transatlantic bell on its front end, which had been presented in commemoration of its trip to the USA.
Nos.6125-49 originally bore names commemorating early LNWR locomotives, with brass plaques bearing an etched outline design of the engine in question, but in 1935-6 these were replaced by regimental names.
All were still in service in 1959.
As built – Driving wheels – 6’ 9”, Cylinders (3) – 18”x 26”, Pressure – 250 lb., Tractive effort – 33150 lb., Weight – 84 tons 9 cwt, LMS classification – 6P, BR classification – 6P
As rebuilt with taper boiler – Driving wheels – 6’ 9”, Cylinders (3) – 18”x 26”, Pressure – 250 lb., Tractive effort – 33150 lb., Weight – 83 tons, LMS classification – 6P, BR classification – 7P

23

Steam Locomotives of a More Leisurely Era – 1927 – ‘Kings’ – GWR

Steam Locomotives of a More Leisurely Era
1927 – ‘Kings’
GWR

No.6019 King Henry V as built

No.6019 King Henry V as built

The largest and most powerful variant of the numerous family of GWR 4-6-0s; thirty were constructed by Collett between 1927 and 1930. They remained the ultimate peak of GWR express design for the rest of the Company’s existence, as after the ill-fated ‘Great Bear’ that railway never again went in for a ‘Pacific’. The new ‘Kings’ in fact were claimed, and indeed have proved themselves in practice, to possess practically as much hauling power as most ‘Pacific’ designs. Their nominal tractive effort actually exceeds the rated value of the LMS, LNER and SR ‘Pacifics.

King Richard III
For many years these engines have worked the principal trains on the West of England main line, including, of course, the ‘Cornish Riviera’, and between Paddington and Birmingham. Several improvements have been effected since the engines first appeared, such as increased superheat, and more recently they have been fitted with double blast pipes and chimneys. In 1935 No. 6014 was disfigured similarly to ‘Castle’ No. 5005 by a hideous sort of semi-streamlining, but like the ‘Castle’ this was soon mercifully removed.
The original engine, No. 6000 ‘King George V’ visited the USA in the same year that it was built for taking part in the Centenary procession of the Baltimore and Ohio Railway, and it still carries on the front end the American type bell with which it was presented.
All were still in service in 1959.
Driving wheels – 6’ 6”, Cylinders – 16½”x 28”, Pressure – 250 lb., Tractive effort – 40300 lb., Weight – 89 tons, BR classification – 8P.

King Charles I

Steam Locomotives of a More Leisurely Era – 1927 – ‘Garratts’ – LMS

Steam Locomotives of a More Leisurely Era
1927 – ‘Garratts’
LMS

No. 4999 as originally built

No. 4999 as originally built

In 1927 the LMS decided to try out the Garratt design for heavy mineral trains over the Midland main line between Toton and Cricklewood, with a view to eliminating double heading. Three engines, Nos. 4997-9, were built by Beyer Peacock in 1927, and were followed by another thirty, Nos. 4967-96.
In 1938-9 they were renumbered 7967-99, and these numbers were increased by 40000 at Nationalisation in 1948.

47994
All except Nos. 47998 and 47999 were later fitted with revolving bunkers to ease the work of the fireman.
For some reason the Garratt design never achieved the favour in this country it has received elsewhere, notably in South Africa, and the whole class was scrapped between 1955 and 1958.
Driving wheels – 5’ 3”, Cylinders (4) – 18½”x 26”, Pressure – 190 lb., Tractive effort – 45620 lb., Weight – 155½ tons.

4999