Category Archives: Chasewater Railway Museum

CANNOCK CHASE MINING HISTORICAL SOCIETY – Talk and Hawkins Book

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CANNOCK CHASE MINING HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Founded 2002

HQ: 27 Melbourne Rd, Heath Hayes, Cannock, Staffs. WS12 2SH

Dear Member

The next members meeting with speaker will be held on Wednesday May 21st at the Museum of Cannock Chase, Valley Rd, Hednesford, Staffs. WS12 1TD.

We start at 3.00pm prompt and the speaker will be DAVID MOORE who will speak on ‘South Staffs Water’

Please make every effort to attend as numbers were low at the last event the Panama Canal talk

Bring a friend or partner its free with no obligations

BREAKING NEWS

Hot from the printers the “Hawkins Colliery” book is now available for purchase it costs £10.00/copy + P&P and they are available from the address above.

The book will also be available from the Chasewater Railway Museum

This IS the final book in the series and the society would like to thank everyone who has helped with or supported this monumental task

Thank You Very Much

Best Regards

Alan Dean (Chairman)

Webpages: http://www.ccmhs.co.uk

Email: enquiries@ccmhs.co.uk

Chasewater Railway Museum Donation

Chasewater Railway MuseumDSCF9073

Donation

The Chasewater Railway Museum has received a significant donation from Dr.P.Fuller in memory of her late father, Mr. Anthony William Eele Fuller.  This donation comprised approximately 100 books, 50 DVDs, 30 videos, 5 pictures and a Hornby GWR Mixed Traffic train set.DSCF9099

The photograph shows some of the museum staff perusing a small part of the collection, some of which will add to the museum’s collection of books and DVDs while others will be sold to add to the museum’s funds for future purchases of railway artefacts.  The model railway has already been sold to a member of the railway, making a significant contribution to funds.

The Chasewater Railway Museum sends Dr. Fuller sincere condolences on her loss and many thanks for the donation, which will be put to good use.

Chasewater Railway Museum News – LNWR Private Sidings Diagrams

Chasewater Railway Museum News

LNWR Private Sidings Diagrams

The Chasewater Railway Museum has recently acquired a folder containing over 200 diagrams of private sidings on the London & North Western Railway, dated Euston 1911.FolderTitle PageAs can be seen, the folder itself is rather fragile, but the diagrams inside are in very good condition.Anglesey SidingsAnglesey Sidings

Our good friend Ian Pell has put all the diagrams onto a CD, which is now in the Museum – thanks Ian.Cannock Branch, Hednesford RPSCannock Branch, Hednesford – the shed on the centre-left of the photo is the original HQ of the Railway Preservation Society.Cooper's Junction Green pipeCooper’s Junction, near to the Cannock Wood CollieryFrom Pye Green ValleyHednesford Station area, showing the sidings coming from the Pye Green Valley – West Cannock No. 1 Colliery.Holly BankHolly Bank Colliery

Just a few samples which are of local interest the the Chasewater Railway.

Steam Locomotives of a More Leisurely Era – More from David Ives archive

Steam Locomotives of a More Leisurely Era

More from David Ives archive

4247 Preservation Society Leaflet 198-Literature sent to Chasewater Railway in the 1980s

4247 Pres. Society Application Form

A report from the Flour Mill Locomotive Repair Shop

4247

On behalf of the Bodmin & Wenford Railway Trust we overhauled the boiler of 1916-built GWR 2-8-0 tank 4247 (owned by 4247 Ltd), which needed a complete new steel backhead along with other significant work: the work also involved a lot more than just the boiler. It took just over a year and 4700 hours, 60% on the boiler. 4247 returned to Bodmin in November 2011.

4247 GWSR Toddington  8-8-2004Phil Scott’s Pic at Toddington 8-8-2004

 This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The Great Western Railway (GWR) 4200 Class is a class of 2-8-0T steam locomotives. They were designed for short-haul coal trips from coal mines to ports in South Wales, working 1000+ ton coal trains through the Welsh valleys. The locomotives were built with large boilers and narrow side tanks; these engines would pass numerous water stops along their routes so the limited tank capacity was not a constraint. Because of the class’s heavy water consumption and limited tank capacity they were nicknamed “Water Carts”.

Many of the lines in South Wales had sharp curves. To traverse these curves, the locomotives were constructed with side play in the trailing driving wheels and coupling rods with spherical joints to allow for movement in any direction.

The later 5205 Class were very similar.

105 4200s were build between 1910 and 1923. Fourteen of these were rebuilt between 1937 and 1939 as 2-8-2T of the 7200 Class. In later years many of the remainder were upgraded to 5205 specification with outside steam pipes, larger cylinders and in some cases curved frames at the front end.

Chasewater Railway Museum News – A couple of old photographs

ChasewaterRailwayMuseum News

 A couple of old photographs

5818 - Works SidingsThe first one is a photograph of the ‘Works Siding’ notice in situ in the old Brownhills West yard.  Also in the photo is the Manchester, Sheffield & Lincoln carriage, looking quite smart considering it was kept outside in those days.  Now the notice is standing on the hand-pump truck outside the museum.

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The other photograph is of Much Wenlock  station. Much Wenlock StationThis one comes from a selection of paperwork and photographs from David Ives – a long-time Board member.  On the reverse of the photo are two Newspaper articles in small, very neat hand-writing, which I have reproduced here.

Much Wenlock Station Picture reverse

December 1895 – The Wellington Journal

During the railway mania the heart of Dr. Brookes was stirred to the very depths.  He saw lines after lines projected and schemes of railways propounded in all sorts of directions, some merely speculative, others ‘bona fide’, and he wooed in vain the great companies to look in the direction of Wenlock, but the most reckless stood aghast at the steep gradients and the abrupt curves to be encountered in climbing the hill; besides, several companies gave the project the greatest opposition.  Ultimately, mainly through the unwearied exertions of Mr. Blakaway, the Town Clerk, aided and seconded by Dr. Brookes and his brother, Dr. Q.G.Brookes, who became Chairman of the Company, and continued so till his death, these efforts were crowned with success, and the hitherto isolated town of Much Wenlock found itself in communication with the productive district of Corvedale and Ludlow on one side, and Coalbrookdale, Wellington and Birmingham on the other.  The line is 16 miles in length, the gradients, the greatest of which is from 1 in 40 to 1 in 45, are not so great at this time of day as to frighten anybody.  If anyone travelling that way is struck with the beauty of Wenlock station, its rocky pile on the Abbey side, studied with flowers, rare plants and shrubs, asks, as many do, who was the author of so much beauty, he is told – Dr. Brookes.

July 1962 ‘The Last Train’ The Birmingham Post

 Engine No. 4406 is not the most glamorous of railway locomotives and there was nothing spectacular about the two coaches which it pulled from Wellington to Craven Arms and back again on Saturdays.  The majority of passengers from Wellington alighted at Much Wenlock, and on the return journey only one ticket was issued at the booking office at Craven Arms.

Yet this was one occasion when the rather elderly engine and the empty carriages could have been fêted along the 14 miles between Craven Arms and Much Wenlock, for it was the last journey to be made along this line, which was opened in 1867.  But in its demise the Craven Arms to Much Wenlock line aroused as little interest as it had attracted custom these latter years – and that lack of custom is the reason for its closure.  The one ticket issued at Craven Arms was for Mr. J.F.Anstey, the District Commercial Superintendent, who was there to give official recognition to the last journey.  There was another railwayman or two, one or two returning passengers and a party of railway enthusiasts from Birmingham and District – for Birmingham took a greater interest in the closing of the line than did Shropshire.

There was no ceremony at Craven Arms.  Driver Joe Watkins looked down the platform at Guard Dick Davies.  There was a wave and the driver said to his passengers: ‘Well, I suppose we had better be off.’ And off we went, with Driver Watkins taking the train along the single track as he had done for twenty-odd years.  Beside him, shovelling coal into the furnace was Fireman Tony Falkner.  At Much Wenlock Mr. K.Carpenter was there, also Mr. D.Luscombe of Northfield, Mr. D.Woodhouse of Smethwick, Mr. Tandy and Mr. R.T.Russell

Much WenlockGWR 4406 2-6-2TMuch Wenlock 4406 on train railuk.inforailuk.info

Among the latest additions to the Chasewater Railway Museum Collection: A Horseshoe-Shaped Wagon Plate

Among the latest additions to the Chasewater Railway Museum Collection:

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Horseshoe-shaped wagon plate

The latest wagon plate to be put on display in ChasewaterRailwayMuseum is an example of one of the horseshoe-shaped variety of the Thomas Burnett & Co. Ltd., Doncaster.  The horseshoe shape was chosen by Burnett’s to reflect the importance of their base in Doncaster to the British horse racing scene. 

It is approximately 8″ tall by 8″ at its widest

 Burnett’s were a well respected firm of wagon repairers with several repair depots.

 In 1951 the Company merged into Wagon Repairs Ltd. and the name ‘Burnett’ vanished.

2 Centenarians at Chasewater Railway

On platform colour

2 Centenarians at Chasewater Railway

The Chasewater Railway Museum has  a significant amount of paperwork formerly belonging to David Ives, a founder member of the Railway Preservation Society and a long-time Board Member of the Chasewater Railway.  Our curator is working his way through this paperwork to put it in some sort of order, and is finding some interesting photographs in some of the boxes, including the ones shown here.B&W no people

The centenarians involved are the traction engine ‘Little Wonder’ and the Neilson steam locomotive known as ‘Alfred Paget’  (2937/1882).

The gentlemen in the photo holding the cake are the late Johnny Mayes, at the time the owner of ‘Little Wonder’,  and the late David Ives of Chasewater Railway, on the right.

Hats off

Museum Archive – Additions to our coal mining memorabilia

Museum Archive

Additions to our coal mining memorabilia

As you are no doubt aware, without the coal industry there would be no Chasewater Railway, as the original line was built  for transporting coal, although passenger services were introduced from Brownhills to Aldridge via Walsall Wood.  We are always glad to receive artefacts from the mining industry to display in the Museum.

Baths Invitation

The latest of such items to come our way are an invitation to the opening of the Pithead Baths at Wyrley No. 3 Colliery, Great Wyrley, on August 14th, 1954, and The Bather’s Handbook.

Handbook 1

Handbook 2

Handbook 3

Handbook 4

Handbook 5

Handbook 6

These items came to the Museum from a former employee of the Colliery, his first job after National Service with the RAF.

News – Scamp Unveiling

2008_0714Maquette In the Museum 2

News – Scamp Unveiling

Scamp

  Mr. Ron Bradbury taking the maquette into the Heritage Centre.It was in July 2008 that Chasewater Railway was first introduced to the SCAMP project when Ron Bradbury and the Burntwood Chase Heritage Group brought the maquette to the Railway and ran a fish and chip special train to raise funds for the statue.  The maquette was proudly displayed in the Museum for a number of weeks before being shown at other venues.  Now, some five years later, the project is nearing its completion.

Scamp PonyThe pony model – and friends!

Scamp unveiling

Scamp resize 8Real progress being made

A statue to commemorate Burntwood’s mining heritage is to be officially unveiled on June 8th.

The 7 ft bronze memorial has been created by sculptor Peter Walker, who hails from the town, and will be sited at Sankey’s Corner.

The artwork was about five years in the making and was made possible thanks to public donations and £10,000 of funding from local developers.

Ron Bradbury, of Sankey’s Corner Arts Mining Project (SCAMP) said: ‘After many years of fundraising, the dream of a statue to stand on Sankey’s Corner is about to be fulfilled.’

No time has yet been set for the official unveiling, which is open for anyone to attend.  A book is being produced about the history behind Scamp and pit ponies and will be on sale at £10 each, containing a list of names on the plinth.  All profits will go to Scamp.

Anyone willing to help by providing food or entertainment, or with funding, should call 01543 677789.

2008_0714Maquette0065

Museum News – New Acquisitions

Chasewater Logo 3Museum News

New Acquisitions

An opportunity presented itself  recently to acquire by way of private purchase half a dozen items of local colliery railway interest.  Not since the 1960s and early 1970s, when in that period a good relationship existed between the Railway Preservation Society and local National Coal Board management and which resulted in several donations of interest has the chance to obtain in bulk such star items for the museum collection.

McClean 205103 McClean 0-4-2ST Beyer Peacock 28-1856 Cannock Chase Colliery CoMcClean

First and arguably the finest piece from the Chasewater Railway point of view is the nameplate McClean from the 1856 built Beyer Peacock, the first of five similar locomotives delivered between 1856 and 1872. McClean lasted one hundred years before scrapping and in her later years was considered to be the oldest loco in the country still at work. The name McClean was bestowed in honour of John Robinson McClean who first came on the local scene as engineer in the construction of the South Staffordshire Railway before later, together with Richard Chawner leased land to mine coal forming the Cannock Chase Colliery.

Marquis 2 05008 No.1 Marquis 0-6-0STIC Lilleshall 1867 C & RMarquis
The second of the three locomotive nameplates to arrive is Marquis. The name originates from the first Marquis of Anglesey, a title awarded to the Earl of Uxbridge who fought along side Wellington at the Battle of Waterloo. Carried by the Lilleshall Company built 0-6-0 saddle tank new to the Cannock and Rugeley Collieries as their first loco in 1867, she or is it he lasted until cut up at the NCB Cannock Central Workshops during May 1964.

Beaudesert 205024 No.5 Beaudesert 0-6-0ST Fox Walker 266-1875 C & RBeaudesert
The third nameplate is that of Beaudesert from the little 0-6-0 saddle tank built by Fox Walker, works number 266 of 1875 supplied new to Cannock and Rugeley Collieries as their number 5. Beaudesert was the ancestral home of the Paget family who became Earls of Uxbridge before being given the title and Estate Marquis of Anglesey. Finally cut up in 1964 the other nameplate of the loco survives and is on display in Kidderminster Railway Museum.

2013_0416 RSHTwo locomotive worksplates comprising of a cast iron Robert Stephenson and Hawthorns Ltd, 7292 of 1953 and Hunslet 3789 of 1953 have come as part of the deal.
Both locomotives were of the Austerity type, the RSH coming to Littleton Colliery from its previous owner the War Department, in May 1947, originally WD 71483 she became number 6 at Littleton being cut up there in Oct. 1970.
The Hunslet was delivered to Chasetown numbered 3 and was a replacement for the aged fleet of Victorian locos, she later saw service at Cannock Wood and Granville where she met her end after a life of just 16 years.

2013_0416 Hunslet
Finally a possibly unique cast iron sign headed The Littleton Collieries Ltd. with the wording.

The Littleton Collieries Ltd
Notice No Road
all persons found trespassing
upon or damaging any property
belonging to the above company
will be prosecuted.

Quite where the above sign was fixed is not yet known, but enquiries are being made.
It may be a little while before all of the above items are incorporated into our permanent display but the intention is to make arrangements to put them on view as soon as possible.

Barry Bull
Museum Curator
Chasewater Railway Museum

Notice 2

My thanks to Barry Bull for the information and Bob Anderson for the typing! CWS