Canal News – Alvecote, Market Drayton & Alrewas

Canal News

Annual Alvecote Working Boat gathering

A Boat Trip on the Coventry Canal

A Boat Trip on the Coventry Canal

23 Aug 2014
1100 am – 8:00 pm
Address
Samuel Barlow
Robeys Lane
Alvecote
Near Tamworth
Staffs
B78 1AS

Head to the boat gathering at Alvecote Marina on the Coventry Canal, with stalls and entertainment galore.
Attractions will include historic working boats from the Narrowboat Trust, live music, a beer festival, craft stalls and lots more.

Floating market at Market Drayton

Floating Market

Floating Market

22 – 25 Aug 2014
10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Address
Market Drayton, Cheshire
Make your way to Market Drayton on the Shropshire Union Canal and enjoy a few hours browsing around a market with a difference.
Come and browse at this floating market where colourful narrowboats will be selling everything from tiller pins to take-aways.
Why not take your family along and take a walk along the picturesque towpath while you’re there?
Trading boats
The RCTA is still taking bookings from trading boats. For more information and to book your place at one of these events visit http://www.canaltraders.org.uk/markets.html.
If you’ve got any questions about the upcoming markets please contact michael@canaltraders.org.uk.

Alrewas Arts Festival

Alrewas
23 – 30 Aug 2014
11:00 am – 9:00 pm
Address
Alrewas, near Lichfield
Staffordshire

The picturesque village of Alrewas is staging a week-long arts festival, kicking off with an arts and crafts street market on the opening Saturday followed by a ceilidh at the village hall in the evening.
Bank Holiday Monday, August 25, will be Music Monday with a variety of bands and musicians playing at pubs and clubs throughout the village from noon until midnight. Art and photographic exhibitions will be open to the public throughout the week and it will be a good opportunity for canal boats, displaying and selling crafts, to moor up in the village.
A graffiti art project involving local youngsters will be on display under one of the canal bridges, so watch out for it as you pass.
There will also be a variety of entertainment on offer, including a folk breakfast, lunchtime concerts, drama, dance, comedy, storytelling, poetry performances and daily morning movies for youngsters. There will be big art events and some patchwork surprises.
The festival will end with a twilight lantern parade, firework display and a grand finale open-air concert on the village playing field, featuring some great bands, ranging from jazz to hard rock.
There is no charge and all are welcome. Bring chairs, blankets, wine and nibbles and enjoy. To find out more and view pictures and video clips from previous festivals, go to the festival website: http://www.alrewas-artsfest.co.uk

Lichfield News – Food Festival and Bike Ride

Lichfield News

 Food Festival and Bike Ride

 

Lichfield Food Festival Market and Pop Up Cookery Demos

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Festival goers will be spoilt for choice with the wide range of food and drink stalls and pop up cookery demonstrations at Lichfield Food Festival Market.
This year’s Lichfield Food Festival Market will take place on the Market Square, and will extend to surrounding streets and through Three Spires Shopping Centre. It will run on Saturday 30 August from 9am to 5pm and on Sunday 31 August between 10am and 4pm.

Organised by Lichfield City Council, the weekend market will bring an abundance of passionately produced food from across the region and beyond, together with a wide range of goods to Lichfield.

Markets’ Officer Rachel Clive said: “With such a versatile selection of delicious traditional British and multi-cultural hot and cold food on offer over the weekend, Lichfield Food Festival Market will definitely have something to suit all tastes. On Sunday children can enjoy the experience with a visit to the children’s activity stall on Market Square where, for £2.50, they can create their own personalised sweetie box to take home.”

To see all of the stall holders that will be showcasing their produce, visit http://www.lichfieldfood.co.uk/market/

One of the market’s highlights will be the pop up cookery demonstrations taking place over the two days of the festival on Market Square, organised by Central England Co-operative in association with chef Simon Smith.

Top chefs from across the region will prepare dishes in front of the crowds using The Co-operative food range.

The series of free displays will kick off on Saturday 30 August at 11am when head chef Paul Gilmore from Restaurant Gilmore will take to the pop up kitchen. They will run on the hour with the last demonstration starting at 4pm. Chefs, including choclatier Daniel Jones, star baker Duncan Hindley, local private caterer Simon Smith, Trevor Hancock from Super Yachts and Gail Abbey from Sospa Fitness, will also be cooking up a storm on Saturday.

On Sunday 31 August, the demonstrations will start at 12noon when Paul Bough will prepare dishes using Henckel Zwilling Knives. The displays will run on hour, and will also feature Richard Turner from Turner’s Restaurant, Matt Davies from Moat House and Sorrento’s Head chef Umberto. The final display of the festival will be by the owner of Lichfield’s Ruby restaurant, who will demonstrate Chinese dishes from 4pm.

Chef Simon Smith said: “From high end dining and healthy eating, to chocolate treats and fun food for the family, there are plenty of displays to choose from.”

Lichfield Food Festival also includes a celebration of local brewers in the Guildhall, cookery demonstrations showcasing kitchen gadgets at The Kitchen Shop and The George Hotel, a children’s Cupcake Hunt starting at St Mary’s in the Market Square (Saturday only), a baking competition at Three Spires Shopping Centre (Sunday), as well as food and drink trails.

Some familiar faces will also be appearing, including TV chef Rachel Green, the QVC and Ideal World TV presenter, Mal Harradine, and Christine Wallace, finalist in the Great British Bake Off.

For the full Lichfield Food Festival programme, please visit http://www.lichfieldfood.co.uk

There will be road closures over the two day festival that will affect Tamworth Street (lower section), Conduit Street, Breadmarket Street, Market Street and Bore Street. To find the nearest car parks, please visitwww.lichfielddc.gov.uk/carparkmap

Lichfield Food Festival is organised in partnership by Lichfield District Council, Central England Co-operative, Chef Simon Smith, Lichfield City Council, Three Spires Shopping Centre, Lichfield Arts, Tippers, Cakeydora, The Kitchen Shop and The George Hotel. It is sponsored by Central England Co-operative, Tippers and NFU Mutual.

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August’s cycle ride for all

13963726951_643031824f_bEveryone’s invited to get on their bike and join a cycle ride to Fisherwick Lakes on Sunday 24 August 2014.
Following July’s Cycle Rides for All, which saw 35 people go on a three and a half mile taster cycle ride that set off from Beacon Park, the partnership behind the series of monthly rides is once again inviting keen cyclists to get on their bike for August’s ride.

The sixth group cycle ride in the series is to Fisherwick Lakes on Sunday 24 August. It is an eight and a half mile cycle ride there and back and has been awarded a level 2 for difficulty, which means it is suitable for all.

Councillor Andy Smith, Lichfield District Council’s Cabinet Member for Leisure & Parks, said: “We’re always keen to encourage more people to get on their bikes and take part in this healthy and fun activity, and so are pleased to be working in partnership to support these monthly cycle rides. They are a great way for people to discover good cycle routes, meet new people, and have an enjoyable day out.”

To join in this free cycle ride, simply bring your bike to Freedom Cycles, in Lichfield Bus Station, at 10am on Sunday 24 August, where it will be given a safety check before the group sets off. Under 16s must be accompanied by an adult.

To find out more, or to check whether a ride is taking place if the weather is uncertain, please call Freedom Cycles on 01543 411633 or Karl Sproston at Lichfield District Council on 01543 308846.

Details of this and September’s cycle ride can be found online at http://www.lichfielddc.gov.uk/cyclerides.

Cycle Rides for All is run in partnership by Lichfield District Council, Freedom Cycles, Bromford Living, North Lichfield Initiative and Lichfield City Council.

Railway Miscellany – Railroads Create the First Time Zones – St. Paul Union Depot, Seven Years After Closing

Railway Miscellany

November 18, 1883: Railroads Create the First Time Zones

tumblr_mwgum66Axb1r2u8sso1_r1_500Photo: Railroads. Men working on locomotive II, ca. 1920-ca. 1950. (Library of Congress)

On this day in 1883, American and Canadian railroads began using four continental time zones. This stemmed from schedulers’ confusion transporting passengers across thousands of local times. Most towns in the United States had their own local times based on “high noon” when the sun reached its highest point in the sky.
The railroad companies created the new time coding system without assistance from the federal government. Most Americans and Canadians embraced the time zones since railroads were the primary link between the two countries. Congress did not officially adopt the time zones until 1918 under the Interstate Commerce Commission.
Check out American Experience’s “Streamliners” timeline of significant events related to the development of American railroads.

St. Paul Union Depot, Seven Years After Closing, 1978

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tumblr_mm2nmvZlof1r5yoejo3_500Photo via Flickr: Electroburger’s Photostream

Passenger rail service officially came to an end in downtown St. Paul on April 30, 1971. The last train, the Burlington Afternoon Zephyr, left the depot that evening, bound for Minneapolis. Amtrak launched its passenger service to the Twin Cities the next day, bypassing downtown St. Paul. These photos, taken seven years after the fact, come from a wonderful collection by Kurt Haubrich.

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era – 1939 3-Cylinder 4-6-0 – Great Southern Railway

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era
1939 3-Cylinder 4-6-0
Great Southern Railway

No.801 as running in 1948.

No.801 as running in 1948.

Three engines built in 1939 for working the heaviest expresses over the main line between Dublin and Cork. They were named after the Queens of Ireland, No.800 ‘Maeve’, 801 ‘Mocha’ and 802 ‘Tailte’, and were destined to be the last new conventional steam locomotives constructed for the GSR or Coras Iompair Eireann, as it later became. They were the most powerful express locomotives ever built for an Irish railway, and their remarkable similarity to the English rebuilt ‘Royal Scots’ will be noted.
Since dieselisation there has been little suitable work for them, and No.802 was broken up in 1957. As a matter of interest the dimensions of the LMS rebuilt ‘Royal Scots’ are shown for comparison.
GSR 800 class – Driving wheels – 6’ 7”, Cylinders (3) – 18½”x 28”, Pressure – 225 lb., Tractive effort – 33000 lb., Weight 84 tons
LMS rebuilt ‘Royal Scots’ – Driving wheels – 6’ 9”, Cylinders (3) – 18”x 28”, Pressure – 250 lb., Tractive effort – 33150 lb., Weight 83 tons

GSRLoco Spellerwebhttp://spellerweb.net

 

 

Some Early Lines – Old Railway Companies – The Newtown and Machynlleth Railway

Some Early Lines

Old Railway Companies

The Newtown and Machynlleth Railway

The Newtown and Machynlleth Railway (N&MR) was a short railway created to allow the Oswestry and Newtown Railway and the Mid-Wales Railway access the Mid-Wales market town of Machynlleth, from their communal station at Newtown, Powys. Crossing the River Severn and the Cambrian Mountains, completed in 1863 it became part of the Cambrian Railways system in 1864.

Machynlleth StationMachynlleth station still sports much that is original on 28 May 1988, though as this picture was taken came news that it was for sale. The train shown had arrived late after a breakdown, and, having terminated, was about to return to Euston. (Allan Mott)

History
In July 1864 the line was absorbed into the Cambrian Railways. Cambrian Railways were absorbed by the Great Western Railway on 1 January 1922 as a result of the Railways Act 1921, and became part of British Railways in 1948.
There was an accident in the Talerddig cutting on 18 January 1921, of which several pictures survive. Hence, even since the first track rationalisation of the line during the 1970s, there remains to this day a passing loop on this single track line at the site of Talerddig station, retained in the need to “pin down” the brakes on freight trains over the summit, and now a critical operational node for passing passenger trains.[4]
Talerddig cutting
A significant civil engineering achievement on the line is the Talerddig cutting through solid rock. With a depth of 120 feet (37 m), it was the deepest cutting in the world at the time of its completion in 1862. For safety reasons, the original near-vertical sides have since been trimmed back.

Talerddig_cutting_-_geograph.org.uk_-_856895Talerddig cutting
The means by which the Newtown and Machynlleth Railway (which became a constituent of the Cambrian Railways) breached the Cambrian Mountains to head for the coast. Compared with SH9200 : Railway Cutting at the summit of Talerddig bank there’s been some extensive regrowth.
© Copyright Nigel Brown and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Present
Today, after the closure during the Beeching Axe of much of the former-Cambrian system, the entire length of the N&MR remains open as part of Network Rail’s Cambrian Line, operated by the Class 158 DMUs of Arriva Trains Wales.

1024px-Machynlleth_Station_with_eastbound_local_train_geograph-2545274-by-Ben-BrooksbankMachynlleth Station with eastbound local train
View westward, down the Dovey Valley towards Dovey Junction, then Aberystwyth/Barmouth and Pwllheli. The locomotive is one of the first Churchward ‘4500’ 2-6-2T, No. 4501 (built 11/06 as No. 2162).
© Copyright Ben Brooksbank and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Newtown StationNewtown: station buildings
The main station buildings on the Up (eastbound) platform at Newtown / Y Drenewydd.  © Copyright Stephen Craven and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

 

Some Foreign Lines – A Hotel on Wheels: Francisco de Goya -The Castles of Britain – Trans-Siberian Railway

 Some Foreign Lines

 

A Hotel on Wheels: Francisco de Goya

3 Pic
Renfe
Route: Paris to Madrid
Duration: 13 hours, 30 minutes
Leave Paris in the evening, enjoy a three-course dinner and the increasingly rural scenery, slumber to the soothing rhythm of the rails, and wake the next day as you arrive in Madrid, rested and ready to tour the third-most-populous city in the European Union. Grand class includes a welcome drink, gourmet dinner, breakfast, and an in-room bathroom with shower.

 Reliving the Age of Chivalry: The Castles of Britain

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BritRail
Route: Inverness, Scotland, to Gwynedd, Wales
Duration: 15 days
Discover the United Kingdom’s historic fortresses on this itinerary combining a two-week BritRail pass with the Great British Heritage pass. You’ll get entry to 580 attractions, as you hop off for local touring. Start in Inverness, Scotland, near Loch Ness, to tour Urquhart Castle. Continue south to Stirling Bridge, where William Wallace triumphed over the English in 1297, and on to Edinburgh Castle. English sights include Dover Castle, with its wartime tunnels. In Gwynedd, Wales, tour Caernarfon Castle, a World Heritage site where the investiture of Prince Charles was held.

The Epic Journey: Trans-Siberian Railway

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Reuters
Route: Moscow to Vladivostok, Russia
Duration: 19 days
This fabled route, an icon of Russian culture, crosses eight time zones to connect the Russian capital with a port on the Pacific Ocean. On board, poor mingle with rich, young with old, foreigners with locals. Social barriers disappear as passengers share a unique rail experience and shots of $3-a-liter vodka. You can book a private car via a tour operator for added comfort; schedule any number of side excursions from trekking and scuba diving to city tours.

Some Early Lines – Old Railway Companies – Mitcheldean Road & Forest of Dean Junction Railway

Some Early Lines

Old Railway Companies

Mitcheldean Road & Forest of Dean Junction Railway

Dean Forest RlyA substantial stone overbridge near Drybrook (Mitcheldean Road & Forest of Dean Junction Railway). This section opened on 4 November 1907, but closed 0n 7 July 1930. Note the bridge-rail fencing, still extant in August 1988.

This was incorporated on 13 July 1871 to extend the Bullo Pill Railway ( an early British railway, completed in 1810 to carry coal mined in the Forest of Dean Coalfield to a port on the River Severn near Newnham, Gloucestershire. It was later converted to a broad gauge steam line by the Great Western Railway, and was closed in the 1960s) to the Hereford, Ross & Gloucester (both qv) at Mitcheldean Road, 4.75 miles away. Heavy engineering was involved and the line was never finished, despite the company’s absorption by the GWR under an Act dated 6 August 1880. The first 1.75 miles to Speedwell opened in July 1885, and to Drybrook on 4 November 1907, but the rest, though built and maintained, was not. Unused track went for scrap in 1917.
The Mitcheldean Road & Forest of Dean Junction Railway (MR&FoDJR) was a railway which ran for 3 1⁄4 miles (5.2 km) from the former Mitcheldean Road railway station on the Hereford, Ross and Gloucester Railway to a junction at Whimsey near Cinderford.
On 6 August 1880 the company was acquired by the Great Western Railway which completed the line but never opened it to traffic.
The line was later lifted beyond Drybook, although a small section between Drybrook Halt and Drybrook Quarry was relaid in 1928. Drybrook Halt was the northern terminus of a GWR railmotor service from Newnham which ran from 1907 to 1930. The line was closed again in 1952.
A short section of the trackbed at the northern end is used by the narrow gauge Lea Bailey Light Railway.

Loop and Shed at Lea Bailey Light Railway

Loop and Shed at Lea Bailey Light Railway

The Lea Bailey Light Railway is a 2 ft (610 mm) narrow gauge heritage railway in the United Kingdom. It is built on the site of a former gold mine which was started by the Chastan Syndicate in 1906. Having sold 75,000 shares at £1 GBP each, test workings at Lea Bailey and nearby Staple Edge concluded that the small amount of gold present could not be extracted economically. The syndicate was wound up in 1908.
The mine was later extended and some 3000 tons of iron ore were extracted — a small amount compared to the 150,000 tons extracted from the nearby Wigpool Ironstone Mine.
An attempt was made in 2003 by the owners of Clearwell Caves to open the mine as a tourist attraction, but this was ultimately unsuccessful. In 2012, a small group from the Royal Forest of Dean Caving Club discovered the mine and a quantity of disused railway equipment and proposed to the owners that a volunteer-led project could start work on restoring the site. As of 2014, two locomotives and a number of wagons have been moved to Lea Bailey from storage at Clearwell Caves or the nearby Hawthorn Tunnel.
In 2013 the Lea Bailey Light Railway Society was formed; its members act as volunteers, undertaking all aspects of work on the site. A regular free newsletter is produced and sent out by e-mail.

http://www.leabaileylightrailway.co.uk

Lea Bailey Railway

Lea Bailey Railway

News – Hednesford Signal Box & Harper’s Buses

News – Hednesford Signal Box & Harper’s Buses

05374 Hednesford No.1 Signal Box

Hednesford’s No.1 signal box will be transformed into a classroom by college students.
The box was moved to Hednesford Park earlier this year and will be restored by construction students from South Staffordshire College before being put to use as a community hub.
The group, aged 16 to 19, will be painting, decorating, repairing and guttering the box as well as removing its windows and replacing them with wooden frames.
The work will be undertaken in partnership with Cannock Chase Council, the Friends of Hednesford Park and local residents.
The work is due to start in September and teacher David Dew will oversee the restoration.

DSCF9068

http://www.friendsofhednesfordpark.org.uk/

Aston Manor Road Transport Museum (AMRTM)

At AldridgeFor years they had been left to rot in an old barn hundreds of miles away, but now a pair of vintage buses manufactured in the Black Country have returned home to be restored to their former glory.
The coaches came off the production line at Guy Motors Ltd. factory in Fallings Park, Wolverhampton in 1959 and were bought by the Heath Hayes firm Harper Brothers to carry passengers on day trips to the coast. After eleven years of service they were sold to a scout group in Northern Ireland in 1971 and re-deployed to ship youngsters from their headquarters in Limerick to scout camps across the country.
Three years ago it emerged that the 52-seat coaches were stranded in a barn on the outskirts of Dublin in a dreadful condition, their once gleaming distinctive green and yellow paintwork peeled away and tarnished by rust, polished interiors now sullied and engines dead to the world.
But thanks to the generosity of their former owner and an un-named benefactor the buses are back on home soil, having arrived at the Aston Manor Road Transport Museum in Aldridge, after being loaded onto large flat-bed lorries and transported across the Irish Sea.

BusesThree AMRTM Guy Arab LUF vehicles together at last. L to R, the former 1292RE, former 1291RE (ex-Harper’s 58/57, both Willowbrook Viking bodies), LJW336, the ex-Guy demonstrator with SARO body. Having got both the Harpers home, we’ll be appealing again for funds to allow the museum to start restoration of one, at least – and calling in past promises. Let’s see how popular our formal local operator really is!

http://www.amrtm.org

From the Cannock Chronicle: http://yourchronicle.com/

Canal News – Some Events August 16 – 17, 2014

Canal News – Some Events August 16 – 17, 2014

Pirate Weekend at Stoke Bruerne

Pirate

Pirate

16 – 17 Aug 2014
10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Address
The Canal Museum
Stoke Bruerne
nr Towcester
Northamptonshire
Nn12 7SE

Shiver me timbers – pirates are set to invade the Canal Museum at Stoke Bruerne.
Join in a weekend of piratey fun at the Canal Museum, Stoke Bruerne. Artistic mini-pirates can get involved in arts and crafts activities, pirate face painting, tombola and pirate boat trips. Why not dress up as a pirate and join in the fun!

Be a Junior Lock Keeper at Foxton Locks

Foxton Locks Grand Union Canal

Foxton Locks
Grand Union Canal

17 Aug 2014
10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Address
Foxton Locks
Foxton
Leicestershire

Children aged between 7-14 can become a lock keeper for an hour – free event.
Become a junior lock keeper at the famous flight of Foxton Locks.
Booking is essential as spaces are limited.
Parent/Guardian consent is required and they must also be present throughout the activity.
To book your child’s place please contact Sarah.Cook@canalrivertrust.org.uk or text your interest to 07715 377788
This activity is run by the Canal & River Trust in partnership with the Foxton Inclined Plane Trust for the BiCentenary of the Grand Union Canal.

Classic Streamliners – ‘The Flying Yankee’ & ‘The Cincinnatian’

Classic Streamliners

“The Flying Yankee: An Early Streamlined Articulated Trainset”

flyin_yank

The Flying Yankee was a diesel-powered streamliner built in 1935 for the Maine Central Railroad and the Boston and Maine Railroad by Budd Company and with mechanical and electrical equipment from Electro-Motive Corporation. It was also the name of a passenger train, the third streamliner train in North America after the Union Pacific Railroad’s M-10000 and the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad’s Pioneer Zephyr; the Flying Yankee was, in fact, a virtual clone of the latter, except that it dispensed with the baggage/mail space to seat 142 in three articulated cars.

“The Cincinnatian, The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad’s De Luxe All-Coach Passenger Streamliner”

Ciccinnatian Diesel

The Cincinnatian was a named passenger train operated by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O). The B&O inaugurated service on January 19, 1947, with service between Baltimore, Maryland and Cincinnati, Ohio, essentially a truncated route of the B&O’s National Limited, which operated between Jersey City, New Jersey and St. Louis, Missouri. The Cincinnatian is most famed for its original dedicated equipment, rebuilt in the B&O Mount Clare Shops. The design work was done by Olive Dennis, a pioneering civil engineer employed by the railroad and appointed by Daniel Willard to special position in charge of such work for passenger service. The livery used the blue and gray scheme designed by Otto Kuhler, which Dennis laid on the engine and tender in a pattern of horizontal stripes and angled lines. In 1950, its route was changed to travel between Detroit and Cincinnati; the train kept this route until 1971, when Amtrak assumed passenger rail service.

Cin SteamPostcard photo of the Baltimore and Ohio train The Cincinnatian when it was a streamlined steam locomotive. The locomotive shown is No. 5301, “The President Adams”, a 4-6-2 Pacific style locomotive. This photo was taken in July 1956; just a few months later, the beautiful steam-powered streamlined locomotive would be replaced by a more modern and cost-effective diesel.

http://classicstreamliners.wordpress.com