Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era – 1934 – Class 5 – London Midland & Scottish Railway

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era
1934 – Class 5
London Midland & Scottish Railway

No.4777 when new in 1947

No.4777 when new in 1947

One of the most successful designs ever built, these engines have been firm favourites with the operating staff ever since William Stanier first introduced them in 1934. A general purpose mixed traffic locomotive which can be used on almost any duty, reliable and easy on maintenance, is bound to establish itself quickly, and the class multiplied rapidly in consequence, replacing many older and some not-so-old types over all the wide ramifications of the LMS from Wick to Bournemouth.

44687
Nos.5000-5471 were built between 1934 and 1938, and after a hiatus owing to early war conditions the class was resumed in 1943 with 5472-99, 4800-99, then working backwards in batches until the complete series of 842 engines ran under BR numbers from 44658-45499, the final lot coming out in 1950. There are several varieties found in the class, consisting to a great extent of variations in the boiler mountings, and a few have double blast pipes and chimneys. No.44767 is unique in being fitted with Stephenson’s outside link motion instead of the usual Walschaert gear. The main variation occurs with engines 44738-57 which have Caprotti valve gear and with somewhat lower running plates and small splashers (absent in the standard design) present a noticeably different appearance, as do Nos.44686 and 44687, which have no running plates at all, to the great detriment of their looks.

44747
Apart from these 842 engines the type was perpetuated by BR in its 73000 class, totalling another 172 locomotives, which are the obvious descendants of the LMS engines.

44763
All of the class were still in service in 1959, and as far as could be seen there was no immediate likelihood of any withdrawals taking place in spite of the general widespread scrapping proceeding at an ever increasing rate in consequence of dieselisation and electrification. It seems reasonably certain that these useful engines may well be amongst the last to remain for as many more years as steam propulsion continues to find a place in the British Railways system, and they will undoubtedly have earned themselves the right to take their place amongst the ranks of the historic locomotive designs.

44767
Driving wheels – 6’ 0”, Cylinders – 18½”x 28”, Pressure 225lb., Tractive effort – 25455lb., Weight varies between 72 and 75 tons, LMS and BR classification 5.

44971Ayrshire

 

The next major event at the Chasewater Railway: Charity Day

The next major event at the Chasewater Railway:

Charity Day

Chasewater charity day 2014

271 – Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces From Chasewater News – Spring 2004 Part 4 – The Heritage Centre

271 – Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces
From Chasewater News – Spring 2004
Part 4 – The Heritage Centre

HC 1HC 2HC 3HC 4HC 5Heritage Centre Progress pics

Lichfield News – Cycle rides for all – 2014 programme

Lichfield News

Cycle rides for all – 2014 programme

Get on your bike and enjoy a free, led cycle ride each month

cycle_rides

July’s cycle ride for all
Posted: 17 Jul 2014 07:20 AM PDT
Everyones invited to get on their bike and join a taster cycle ride around Beacon Park and beyond on Sunday 27 July 2014.
The monthly Sunday cycle rides programme, Cycle Rides for All, is back for 2014.
On top of rides to the National Memorial Arboretum and Fradley Junction, this year’s programme also includes the two new locations, of Fisherwick Lakes and Packington Moor Farm near Weeford.
The rides are graded from level 1, which is suitable for beginners, to level 4, which is for more experienced cyclists.
All bikes are given a safety check by Freedom Cycles before setting off. Under 16s must be accompanied by an adult.
We recommend wearing a safety helmet, appropriate clothes, and bringing a packed lunch and drink (although must rides do include a cafe stop).

Canal News – July 19th onward

New Charity LogoCanal News – July 19th onward

Boat liftGraham Evans, Weaver Vale MP conducting a Top of the World Tour at Anderton Boat Lift

Anderton Boat Lift Top of the World Tours

Address
Anderton Boat Lift
Lift Lane
Northwich
Cheshire
CW9 6FW

19 Jul 2014
11:00 am – 3:00 pm
Anderton Boat Lift Top of the World Tours
Ever wanted to get up close and personal to the Anderton Boat Lift?
Well now is your chance, on these unique behind the scenes walking tour! View the lift from this unique perspective.
Tickets are £10 per person
Top of the World Tours can also be combined our other lift & river trips.
Tour departure times are:
11:00
12:15
13:45
15:00
Due the the nature of this tour, persons must be able to walk at height, un-aided. Minimum age policy applies.
Places on these unique tours are limited and booking in advance is highly recommended.
Please contact the Bookings Team on 01606 786 777 for further information or to book a tour.

Alternative tour dates are available throughout 2014

Queen Boadicea II meets a tall ship on the canalQueen Boadicea II meets a tall ship on the canal

Gloucester Quays Food Festival

Address
Gloucester Quays
Gloucester

18 – 20 Jul 2014
11:00 am – 4:00 pm
Celebrity chefs, cookery school, hundreds of stalls, don’t miss the feast for the eyes and stomach!
The Gloucester Quays Food Festival is an unmissable family event with live entertainment, demonstrations from top TV chefs, cookery school for the kids and music on the village green. There’s something for everyone throughout the weekend.

Dragonfly perched near the canalDragonfly perched near the canal

Water wildlife week at Gloucester Waterways Museum

Address
Gloucester Waterways Museum
Llanthony Warehouse
Gloucester Docks
Gloucester
GL1 2EH

19 – 27 Jul 2014
10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Come and discover more about wildlife on the waterways at Gloucester Materways Museum
The British waterways are teeming with wildlife throughout the year, particularly during the summer months.
Visit Gloucester Waterways Museum during our Waterways Wildlife Week and discover more about life along the River Severn and Gloucester & Sharpness Canal.
There will be free wildlife activities throughout the week and on Wicked Wednesday July 23 we’ll be encouraging visitors to take part in a spot of pond dipping!
You can pick up one of our free wildlife bingo cards and spot birds, insects and flowers along the nearby canal towpath, as well as making your own pretty dragonfly in our craft room to take home with you.
So whether you love pretty waterways insects, want to know more about newts and frogs or are inspired to get creative in our craft room, there’s something for everyone.
In addition our canal cruises will be running at 12 noon, 1pm and 2pm, so you can spot wildlife as you relax on the water. See you then!

Foxton LocksFoxton Locks, Grand Union Canal

Be a Junior Lock Keeper at Foxton Locks

Address
Foxton Locks
Foxton
Leicestershire

20 Jul 2014
10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Children aged between 7-14 can become a lock keeper for an hour – free event.
Become a junior lock keeper at the famous flight of Foxton Locks.
Booking is essential as spaces are limited.
Parent/Guardian consent is required and they must also be present throughout the activity.
To book your child’s place please contact Sarah.Cook@canalrivertrust.org.uk or text your interest to 07715 377788
This activity is run by the Canal & River Trust in partnership with the Foxton Inclined Plane Trust for the BiCentenary of the Grand Union Canal.

Ellesmere

Waterways Craft Group at the National Waterways Museum, Ellesmere Port

Address
National Waterways Museum, South Pier Road, Ellesmere Port, Cheshire CH65 4FW

20 Jul 2014
10:00 am – 4:00 pm
This lively group meets the third Sunday of the month (with the odd exception) on the first floor of the Island Warehouse, to demonstrate the traditional crafts of the inland waterways.
Crafts demonstrated include boatman’s belt embroidery, bonnet making, cabin crochet, canal ware painting, rag rugging and patchwork.

 

Some Old Railway Companies – Hayle Railway

Some Old Railway Companies

Hayle Railway

Portreath Incline PicPortreath Incline Text

Slightly unusual in that the line was authorised (27-6-1834), and the company named afterwards, this was a standard gauge line between Hayle and Tresaveen (Gwennap) – 12 miles, with 5 miles of branches. The Portreath branch opened first, for goods on December 23rd, 1837 (passengers in 1841). With Carn Brea Mines –Redruth (goods) on 11th June, 1838, Redruth – Hayle (passenger) 23rd May, 1843. The Portreath arm did such business with ore and coal that it needed enlarging in 1846. The passenger service on the main line was operated by William Crotch, but he soon passed the responsibility to the Railway. Part of the main line became incorporated into the Paddington – Penzance line, via the W. Cornwall Railway, which absorbed the company on 3rd December, 1846. Regular traffic to Portreath ceased about 1930, and the line closed officially from 1st April, 1938.

Chasewater Railway – Burton Brewery Day

Chasewater Railway News

Burton Brewery Day

Poster


Sunday 20th July is Burton Brewery Locomotive day. We are all really looking forward to this special event. The first of its type to held here at Chasewater Railway.

Please note a powerboat racing event is also taking place at Chasewater on this day for which a charge is made for parking on the field near to us from what we understand, this is not the railway’s car park. Please continue to the top of the road to Brownhills West station car park where FREE parking is available for Chasewater Railway customers visiting our event.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Streets ahead – Including shunting at Norton Junction – Brownhills Bob’s Page

Streets ahead.

Reblogged from Brownhills Bob’s page

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era – 1933 – ‘Princess’ Pacifics London Midland & Scottish Railway

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era
1933 – ‘Princess’ Pacifics
London Midland & Scottish Railway

Princess Louise in 1948 at first temporarily numbered M6206 and later 46206, in 1948

Princess Louise at first temporarily numbered M6206 and later 46206, in 1948

One of Mr. (later Sir) William Stanier’s first designs after his appointment as Chief Mechanical Engineer of the LMS. Stanier came from the Great Western, and introduced a number of features of that Company’s practice to the LMS for the first time, including the use of a taper boiler. His first two Pacifics, Nos. 6200 ‘The Princess Royal’ and 6201 ‘Princess Elizabeth, which appeared in 1933, were given thorough trials before any more were built, after which ten similar engines, Nos.6203-12 came out in 1935 with slight modifications following the experience gained with the first two engines, chief amongst these was an increase in the superheater heating surface. The four cylinders on this class has each its own independent set of Walschaert valve gear, but No.6205 later had its inside sets replaced by rocking levers actuated from the outside pair. As might have been expected, these locomotives soon proved themselves to be greatly superior to anything previously seen on the North Western main line. In 1936, in anticipation of the introduction of a high speed service between London and Glasgow, No.6201 was tested with a light load of 230 tons, seven coaches, and succeeded in covering the distance of 401½ miles, non-stop, in the remarkable time of 353½ minutes.

Maud
Concurrently with Nos. 6203-12, there appeared No.6202, which differed radically from its sisters. The boiler, wheels, etc., were identical, but in place of the normal cylinders and reciprocating motion it was propelled by turbines, a large one on the left hand side of the engine, for forward motion, and a smaller one on the right hand for reverse running. It was not the first turbine driven locomotive in this country, other experiments in this direction having been made in the 1920s, but it was undoubtedly the only successful turbine design to appear. Many snags were encountered and the engine spent a good proportion of its life in the works undergoing modifications, but nevertheless when it was in service it was a very good engine, and performed work equal to that of its orthodox sisters. It was a beautiful machine to see in action, with its soft purr and even torque, which resulted in almost complete absence of slipping, even with the heaviest load, a fault to which most ‘Pacifics’ designs are particularly prone.

Victoria
It ran as a turbine until 1952, when it was rebuilt with a normal 4-cylinder propulsion. Previously nameless, it now became ‘Princess Anne’, but its life under its new metamorphosis was exceedingly short, as it was involved in the disastrous Harrow accident in that year, and damaged beyond repair. All the other ‘Princesses, now BR Nos. 46200, 46201 and 46203-12, were in active service in 1959.

Anne Turbine
‘Princess’ class – Driving wheels – 6’ 6”, Cylinders – 16¼”x 28”, Pressure – 250 lb., Tractive effort – 40285 lb., Weight – 104½ tons, BR classification – 8P
No.6202 – Driving wheels – 6’ 6”, Cylinders – N/A, Pressure – 250 lb., Tractive effort –N/A., Weight – 110½ tons, BR classification – N/A

Anne rebuilt

Canal News – Five steps to living a calmer, healthier and happier life.

Canal News

Five steps to living a calmer, healthier and happier life.

New Charity Logo

As Dolly Parton told the crowds at Glastonbury, working 9 till 5 can ‘drive you crazy if you let it’. So don’t let it! Follow our five steps to living a calmer, healthier and happier life.

Family walking
1. Get in touch with nature

It’s an obvious one, and easily achieved. Go and feed the ducks in the park, pick fruit growing wild along the towpath or buy some pretty flowers and spruce up your front garden. Watch them grow and take pleasure in them year after year. If you really are stuck in the office from dusk till dawn, remember that nature doesn’t disappear after dark. An evening stroll is a great remedy for the stresses of the day. Look up at the stars and listen for the hoot of an owl. If you’re lucky you may even spot a bat.

Oak
2. Find your inner child

Nothing makes you forget your over-flowing inbox quicker than the feeling of sand between your toes. Skim some pebbles and watch them bounce over the waves. No beach nearby? No problem. Take off your shoes and socks and walk barefoot on the grass. It’s a great alternative. Buy a shrimping net and go pond-dipping. You never know what you might find. On a windy day, flying a kite will give you a great sense of achievement. Or for the ultimate kick of childlike freedom, find a big hill and run down it. Fling your arms out wide and feel invincible.

3. Learn something new

When we learn a new skill or accomplish something for the first time, we feel proud. When we feel proud, we feel less stressed. Most things are easy when you know how, and the internet is stuffed full of hints and tips for doing just about anything. Make a soufflé, mend that leaking tap or knit your friend a scarf. Or take an evening class and learn a new language. Need more of a challenge? Take up kayaking, or mountain biking or African drumming.

Canoes

4. Give something back

Helping others is a sure fire way to regain a sense of perspective about our own toils and troubles. All manner of charitable organisations are crying out for volunteers up and down the country. From providing companionship for the elderly to helping out at sports camps, there’s something for everyone. It’s always better to give than to receive. And if you’re not a people person, there’s a high demand for volunteers to help out with animals, with woodlands, with canals, with just about everything.
Check out our own volunteering pages for a wide variety of opportunities.

Help
5. Get away from it all

Sometimes we just need to get away, whether that’s a week in the Bahamas or a day trip somewhere more local. A change is as good as a rest, as they say. We’ve put together some free guides to the best days out on the canal and river network.
Find a place to visit near you.

http://canalrivertrust.org.uk/places-to-visit

Check out our own volunteering pages for a wide variety of opportunities.

http://canalrivertrust.org.uk/volunteering